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How do I care for someone with vestibular neuronitis?

Generally, vestibular neuronitis clears up on its own in 7 to 10 days. To care for a person with the disorder during this time, you need to help that person manage his or her symptoms. Also make sure the person takes any antihistamines, antiemetics, or other drugs prescribed as directed. It is also important to make sure the person you are caring for does not get dehydrated if vomiting is a factor. You may want to watch out for signs of possible complications, such as hearing loss, slurred speech, fainting, high fever, weakness, paralysis, double vision, or convulsions.

If you are caring for someone who has persistent vertigo after contracting vestibular neuronitis, you will need to take special care to be sure the person does not fall because of their dizziness. This may mean ensuring they don't walk around in the dark, drive or wear difficult or heeled shoes. To help the person you are caring for become more independent, you can outfit your home with guardrails and offer assistive devices, like walkers, to the person you are caring for.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.