Advertisement

Is Asperger's syndrome serious?

William Stillman
Health Education Specialist

Asperger’s Syndrome is serious only for the person experiencing it if he or she is not well supported or understood, or can’t access a community of compassionate and loving allies. (Asperger’s is not a degenerative disease or a medical-health condition; it is a neurological difference in thinking and logic.)

People with Asperger’s Syndrome may appear to be socially indifferent or disconnected, but, inside, are usually very sensitive about themselves and their place in the world. Placing value on their most passionate of interests; facilitating connections to meaningful relationships; pursuing viable employment opportunities; and educating them about their vulnerability to anxiety and depression can be the difference between poising someone for success and setting them up for failure in the form of increased withdrawal, anger, rigidity, and suicidal ideation.

*Asperger syndrome, or Asperger's, is a term that is no longer used as a formal diagnosis. In current diagnostic criteria, the syndrome is included under the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders.

The severity of Asperger's syndrome depends upon the effect it has on a child. Asperger's syndrome affects children in different ways. Some affected children may have higher IQs than average, while children with lower IQs may have difficulty living independently as adults. As adults, those with a higher IQ can work and live independent lives. Despite the IQ levels of affected children, most benefit from special needs programs in school.

*Asperger syndrome, or Asperger's, is a term that is no longer used as a formal diagnosis. In current diagnostic criteria, the syndrome is included under the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders.

Continue Learning about Autism

Sesame Street Introduces Viewers to Julia’s Family for Autism Awareness Month
Sesame Street Introduces Viewers to Julia’s Family for Autism Awareness Month
In 2017, the children’s TV program Sesame Street introduced a new Muppet for the first time in ten years. Julia, the gang’s shy friend, loves flowers...
Read More
Does autism occur with other health problems?
William StillmanWilliam Stillman
As individuals who are inherently gentle and exquisitely sensitive, those with autism may be vulnera...
More Answers
Autism and Food Aversion: How to Help Your Picky Eater
Autism and Food Aversion: How to Help Your Picky EaterAutism and Food Aversion: How to Help Your Picky EaterAutism and Food Aversion: How to Help Your Picky EaterAutism and Food Aversion: How to Help Your Picky Eater
Our tips can help you cope with your picky eater and avoid mealtime meltdowns.
Start Slideshow
Can the Brain "Recover" from Autism?
Can the Brain "Recover" from Autism?

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.