What are common myths about arthritis?

Tatiana P. Ivan, MD
Family Medicine
Here are some common myths about arthritis:
  • Arthritis is not a serious health problem.

    Arthritis is not only the leading cause of disability in the United States, it is actually a more frequent cause of activity limitations than heart disease, cancer or diabetes. With the Baby Boom generation growing older, the number of people with arthritis is expected to soar over the next two decades. By 2030, an estimated 67 million Americans will have arthritis.
  • People with arthritis should avoid exercising.

    Actually, there is strong evidence that both cardiovascular exercises and light weight-resistance training can provide considerable benefits for people with osteoarthritis and rheumatic conditions. Research indicates that exercise, weight management and the avoidance of joint injury can go a long way in helping to prevent osteoarthritis.
  • Not much can be done for arthritis.

    There are a growing number of treatments for many types of arthritis, including physical therapies and other pain-managing strategies, in addition to healthy lifestyle changes that include diet and exercise. The worst thing to do is ignore symptoms and not seek help.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.