Arthritis

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    For many individuals, arthritis is a chronic disease that can certainly impact quality of life. It may contribute to feelings of depression. If you are feeling depressed, see your family physician and let him or her know.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Arthritis can affect the body in many ways. It strikes your joints, the space between bones, which are held together by muscles, ligaments and tendons. A smooth substance called cartilage coats your joints and helps them gliding easily over each other. It protects the bone from grinding down. If you have a type of arthritis called osteoarthritis, the cartilage grows damaged. 

    Arthritis most often affects:
    • joints that support weight, like your hips, knees and spine
    • joints that are frequently used throughout the day, such as your fingers, arms and feet
    Arthritis causes long-term inflammation of your joints. Over time, this causes further damage to your cartilage and causing bones to press on each other directly. Considering that each bone has many nerves on its surface, bones rubbing together can lead to excruciating levels of pain.

    This content originally appeared on http://blog.doctoroz.com/oz-experts/slow-medicine-for-arthritis
     
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Leaky Gut Syndrome can be caused by the treatment for another disease. In rheumatoid arthritis, for example, the drugs used to relieve pain and inflammation can damage the intestinal lining, leading to Leaky Gut Syndrome within two weeks. Leaky Gut Syndrome, in turn, is associated with aggravation of arthritis.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    In a way, it's a fancy term for "arthritis," which means joint inflammation.

    But there is a difference between synovitis and arthritis. Synovitis describes prominent joint inflammation in which the most dramatic inflammation is of the synovium. This is a thin layer of cells that lines our joints.

    Some types of arthritis, such as osteoarthritis, cause little if any synovial inflammation. This is quite different from the marked synovial inflammation seen in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Doctors may suspect synovitis after hearing details of a person's joint pain. For example, synovitis tends to cause:
    • swelling
    • limited motion
    • stiffness that is worse in the morning
    A physical exam is often helpful to confirm synovitis. For example, a doctor may diagnose synovitis in a finger joint if there is swelling, warmth, soreness when touched, and a thickening of the joint that feels "spongy."

    For a deep joint, such as the hip, synovitis cannot be diagnosed by a physical exam alone. Making this diagnosis may require an MRI or even a biopsy of the joint.

    The difference between synovitis and joint disease that is non-inflammatory is important. Joint diseases in which synovitis is a dominant feature are treated differently from joint disease with less synovial inflammation.

    For example, if an infection is not involved, drugs that suppress the immune system are used to treat chronic synovitis. But these drugs usually don't work when there is no synovitis.

    Because there are more than 100 types of arthritis, the presence or absence of significant synovitis is an important way to classify these diseases and to guide treatment.
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    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a disease that affects the joints, characterized by joint inflammation. The disease may affect multiple joints with swelling, stiffness, pain, rash or fever. JIA is an autoimmune disease, meaning the immune system mistakes one's own body for foreign pathogens, leading to the symptoms described above.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    In the United States, arthritis is the most common form of disability. There are several different kinds of arthritic conditions, but the most commonly seen is degenerative arthritis, also known as osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis represents half of all cases of arthritis and accounts for an estimated 70 million sick days in the workplace each year.

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    The two most common forms of arthritis, osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), afflict one in three American adults. Osteoarthritis, the more prevalent joint condition, often occurs as cartilage wears down over time, causing swelling and pain as bone rubs against bone. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system mistakenly attacks healthy joint tissue, causing inflammation and joint damage.

    Diet and lifestyle habits have the potential to either aggravate or alleviate the symptoms of both conditions. In studies where severe rheumatoid arthritis sufferers switched to a low-fat diet and adopted regular exercise, symptoms decreased dramatically—so much so that patients required less medication. Apparently, dietary changes provide the biggest benefits; symptoms reappeared as soon as patients returned to bad eating habits.

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    Arthritis is a broad term that describes inflammation of the joints. There are many types of arthritis, but if you have lupus, you are more likely to suffer from a type of arthritis similar to rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is symmetric, which means it affects the same locations on either side of the body, and it also usually affects the small joints of your hands, wrists, and feet. But, unlike rheumatoid arthritis, lupus-caused arthritis does not wear away at your bones. Your tendons or ligaments may soften and cause your fingers to curve or turn to one side, but you can treat this condition, called Jaccoud's arthropathy, by manually straightening your fingers.

    About 95 percent of people with lupus experience arthritis or arthralgia, or joint pain.

    Polyarthralgia, which is joint pain that affects five or more joints, and polyarthritis, which is joint inflammation that affects five or more joints, are the most common joint problems associated with lupus.

    In fact, more than half of people with lupus already suffer from these problems patients when they are first diagnosed.

    Lupus arthritis can affect your large joints, such as the knees, shoulders, and elbows, and your small joints, such as the toe and finger joints.

    A variety of medications can help ease lupus-arthritis, including:

    • Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) like naproxen and ibuprofen
    • Anti-malarial drugs, like Plaquenil
    • Steroids and immunosuppressive medications, like methotrexate

    Your doctor will decide which treatment plan is best for you.

    If you have pain in your groin, and you also take steroid medications, you should let your doctor know immediately, since this pain can indicate a more serious problem called osteonecrosis. Sometimes fluid may accumulate in a joint and may require your doctor to drain it.

    Another common joint problem you may have if you suffer from lupus is morning stiffness. Taking a warm shower in the morning helps loosen your synovial, or joint, fluid, and helps your body limber up for the day.

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    A healthy hip joint is a well-defined ball-and-socket joint with a space between the two bones at the point where the head of the femur moves freely inside the acetabulum (the cup-shaped socket in the hip bone) under normal circumstances; in an arthritic hip, the bones of the joint are not clearly defined, and in fact, because the loss of cartilage is extensive, the head of the femur is jams into or grinds against the acetabulum. This leads to a painful joint with limited mobility.
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    A , Podiatric Medicine, answered
    There are about 100 types of arthritis, but osteoarthritis and gout are two types that commonly affect the feet.

    Although any part of the foot can suffer, toes are most frequently affected. One of the most common ailments is hallux rigidus, which involves the loss of flexibility in the big toe due to osteoarthritis in the metatarsophalangeal joint.