Arthritis Prevention

Arthritis Prevention

Arthritis Prevention
A healthy lifestyle can help reduce your risk for arthritis. To help prevent early arthritis, maintain your flexibility and range of motion with regular exercise to build up muscles around your joints. Regular exercise can also help to keep off excess weight that puts increased pressure on your joints (especially the knees) over time. There is no proven diet to prevent arthritis, but adequate bone-building nutrients throughout life (calcium, vitamin D, vitamin K, protein and others) will ensure that your bones start off as healthy as they can be.

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    A , Geriatric Medicine, answered
    Gentle on the joints, tai chi and qigong exercises improve overall flexibility and strengthen the joints. In my clinic, I teach a simple 30-minute daily practice called Eight Treasures qigong, which has been passed down through my family. It has been clinically shown to strengthen bones and joints and prevent arthritis. Best of all, it is far less stressful and strenuous than other types of physical exercise, and particularly emphasizes stretching and the strengthening of joints, tendons and muscles. Most licensed practitioners of Chinese medicine are able to teach some form of qigong and tai chi exercises, or you can learn from an instructional DVD.
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    There is no scientific evidence to show that the development of arthritis is related to diet, either the presence or absence of foods. That said, adequate bone building nutrients throughout life (calcium, vitamin D, vitamin K, protein, and others) will ensure that your bones start off as healthy as they can be.
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    A Internal Medicine, answered on behalf of
    How can I help prevent early arthritis?
    To help prevent early arthritis, maintain your flexibility and range of motion. In this video, Jeetpaul Saran, MD, an internist at Memorial Hospital of Tampa, adds that weight loss can help prevent arthritic pain as well.
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    A , Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, answered
    A study of rheumatoid arthritis patients showed that people who consumed 6 grams a day of olive oil in capsule form experienced a significant improvement in their arthritis symptoms after six months. Many of the participants who consumed olive oil were able to reduce their nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) use. Other studies also found a correlation between increased olive oil consumption and a reduced risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis.

    Because of the inflammatory component that exists in osteoarthritis, it is reasonable and perhaps likely that an anti-inflammatory diet including olive oil could decrease the severity of osteoarthritis symptoms and disease progression.
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    A answered
    The vitamin K in cabbage, spinach, Swiss chard, and other leafy greens may help keep your hands arthritis-free -- all the better for keyboarding, card dealing, piano playing, or knitting. Try shredding your favorite leafy greens (about 4 cups) in a food processor, then toss with 1/4 cup low-fat mayo, 1 teaspoon vinegar, 1 teaspoon honey, and a pinch of salt and pepper. Feeds you and three favorite friends.

    Until recently, vitamin K was known mainly for helping blood clot after a nick or cut. Now you can add it to the list of things that lower the risk of osteoarthritis. In a study of older adults, those who had the most K in their blood were the least likely to have joint damage in their hands, and their knees got some protection, too.

    The United States Department of Agriculture recommendation is at least 90 micrograms (mcg) of vitamin K a day for women and 120 mcg for men. You can get most or all of that in one serving of our Kole Slaw, depending on the greens you use.
    • One cup of shredded cabbage has about 100 mcg of vitamin K.
    • One cup of raw spinach has about 75 mcg.
    • One cup of Swiss chard has a whopping 299 mcg.

    Not a slaw lover? A cup of asparagus has 144 mcg; a cup of broccoli, 93 mcg.

    One caveat: Vitamin K can interfere with blood thinners (warfarin and its ilk). If you take a blood thinner, talk with your healthcare provider -- you need to be extremely cautious about K.

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    A answered
    While arthritis is more common as you age, thanks to the impact of time on the cushiony cartilage that prevents joints and bone from rubbing against one another, age itself doesn't cause arthritis.

    There are steps you can take in your youth to prevent it, such as losing weight, wearing comfortable, supportive shoes (as opposed to three-inch spikes) and taking it easy with joint-debilitating exercise like running and basketball. One study found that women who exercised at least once every two weeks for at least 20 minutes were much less likely to develop arthritis of the knee (the most common location for the disease) than women who exercised less.
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    Some forms of arthritis can be treated, but types of arthritis like osteoarthritis is simply the gradual compromise of the joint from wear and tear. Autoimmune arthritis can be treated with anit-inflamatory medications and autoimmune medications, while septic arthritis is a problem with infection affecting the joint that can be treated with antibiotics. Generally if you are hard on your joints, then there is a higher liklihood of having arthritis.
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    A Family Medicine, answered on behalf of
    For arthritis relief, good walking shoes and low-intensity exercise is important. Losing weight over time will help the joints to carry less weight. From an alternative standpoint, some high-dose omega-3 fish oil, turmeric, and believe it or not, vitamin D in a therapeutic doses, actually help relieve lot of musculoskeletal pain in general.
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    A , Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, answered
    Exercise can help prevent arthritis by stretching and strengthening the structures surrounding the joints, as well as helping to keep the joints well nourished. In addition, exercise helps you lose weight, which is another way to reduce your risk for developing arthritis. Obesity also increases the pain and disability associated with arthritis, and the combination of obesity and arthritis are ingredients for a potentially devastating cycle.
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    Swimming is a good exercise for preventing arthritis, and for reducing pain and stiffness if you have arthritis. Exercising in water is less stressful to your joints because the water’s buoyancy supports the body’s weight, which reduces stress on the joints and minimizes pain.
    Swimming is also a good cardiovascular workout and will help you lose or keep off excess body weight that could add pressure on your knee and hip joints. It also strengthens the muscles around your joints to increase flexibility and slow the progression of arthritis.