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What are the symptoms of arteriosclerosis obliterans?

Mild arteriosclerosis obliterans may cause few symptoms or no symptoms at all. The most common symptom of arteriosclerosis obliterans is intermittent claudication. The term "intermittent claudication" refers to pain and muscle cramps that occur in the legs when walking or performing other physical activity. This pain and cramping can occur anywhere in the legs, depending on the location of the narrow, or blocked, artery. It usually happens in the calves. The pain of intermittent claudication can be mild to excruciating, but usually goes away after about 5-10 minutes of rest.
Other symptoms of arteriosclerosis obliterans include feelings of cold in one or both legs, feelings of weakness or numbness in one or both legs, and non-healing sores on the legs or feet. The skin of your legs may look shiny or change color, the pulse in your legs and feet may weaken or stop altogether, your toenails and leg hair may grow more slowly, and, if you are a man, you may suffer erectile dysfunction.
Severe symptoms include pain in legs from the weight of clothes or sheets and that increases when the leg is elevated.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.