Anxiety Disorders Treatment

Anxiety Disorders Treatment

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  • 2 Answers
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    A , Psychology, answered

    While all of us experience worry from time to time, usually in response to an acute stressor in our lives, sometimes worry takes on a life of its own and we find ourselves feeling constantly worried or anxious. When anxiety symptoms are significant enough that they interfere with our day-to-day functioning, or leave us feeling distressed or not enjoying or being present for our lives-- it's time to get professional help. 

    The good news about anxiety disorders is that they are the most common and the most treatable psychiatric condition. So, the prognosis is very good for people who seek help for their anxiety. 

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    Family members are very important in helping a veteran deal with anxiety disorder. The best course of action  is for the family to support their veteran without contributing to the veteran’s anxiety symptoms. Keep in mind that your veteran might feel embarrassment or stigma about having anxiety disorder.

    Take the condition seriously, and encourage them in getting treatment. Be supportive of the time the veteran needs to adjust to civilian life; some of their anxiety may be related to readjustment challenges. Find out as much as you can about your loved one’s specific disorder to help you understand what they are going through. Don’t try to give advice based on your own experiences or on what you’ve heard from others. Suggest that they get the facts from a doctor or mental health specialist. In the meantime, take care of yourself as well; get emotional support from others, and make sure you are physically active, getting enough sleep, and eating a healthy diet. You can help your loved one most by keeping yourself strong.
  • 4 Answers
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    Some ways to overcome generalized anxiety include:
    • recognizing the cause of anxiety
    • moving into a calm and peaceful mental place by practicing meditation and breathing techniques
    • positive thinking
    • diverting your thoughts
    • accepting and embracing the situation that causes anxiety
    (This answer provided for NATA by the Southern Connecticut State University Athletic Training Education Program)
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Here is one of Dr. Oz’s favorite dinners for reducing anxiety, loaded with worry-fighting compounds.

    Worry-Free Steak: Wind down your day with grilled grass-fed steak, mashed blue potatoes, and steamed asparagus with slivered almonds. It’s OK to have low-fat red meat once a week or so, but be sure it’s organic and grass-fed to maximize its nutritional benefits, particularly omega-3s. The blue color of the potatoes comes from anthocyanins, which in one animal study were shown to contain antioxidants crucial in protecting against stress. The slivered almonds are rich in vitamin B to make your body more resilient to worry and stress, while asparagus is a great source of tryptophan. Be sure to steam, rather than microwave, the asparagus to preserve all its nutrients.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Neurology, answered
    To relax through visual imagery, follow these simple steps:
    • Go to a quiet, dimly lit room where you won't be disturbed.
    • Close your eyes.
    • Begin to recall a place where you have been or would like to be.
    • As you focus on the scene, slowly add details about the experience.
    • For example, you may think, "I am on a warm beach in Florida, lying on the warm sand, basking in the warm sun and listening to the relaxing waves of the ocean a short distance away. I can hear sea gulls flying about overhead. The smell of the salty water is pleasing."
    • If your mind wanders, remind yourself, "I'm going back to the beach, where I'm lying on the warm sand and basking in the warm sun."
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    A , Psychiatry, answered
    In the treatment of anxiety disorders, exposure therapy might be used in any of the following ways:
    • Obsessive-compulsive disorder. Individuals who fear contamination might be encouraged to touch some object that they imagine to be covered with germs. Then they must refrain from washing their hands for several hours. The goal is for them to lessen the anxieties that accompany obsessive thoughts about contamination and, in particular, to do so without compulsively washing their hands.
    • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). During therapy, people are asked to talk or write about the trauma that they experienced. At first, the process can induce tremendous fear and even terror, but as people learn that they can "relive" the experience without being harmed, they are less affected by it, and their anxiety gradually diminishes.
    • Panic disorder. The therapist deliberately induces the symptoms that people fear most by having them spin in a chair, hyperventilate, or run upstairs repeatedly. People can rate experiences as more or less anxiety-provoking, identify the sensations they have been misinterpreting, and understand why their fears are unrealistic. They also practice anxiety-provoking exercises in homework assignments until the fear of fear gradually recedes.
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    Two therapeutic approaches that work well with anxiety are Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT). Both of these behavioral approaches/methods are widely used and have been shown clinically effective in the treatment of anxiety. Cognitive Behavioralists encourage the examination of perceptions, thoughts and behaviors which are directly connected to our feelings, emotions and physical experiences. Through self-monitoring, identifying faulty thinking, challenging distorted thoughts and addressing defeating behaviors, the client can become more cognizant of his/her behaviors and work on changing the outcome. ACT focuses on acceptance, living a life in accordance with one's values, and living in the “here and now” by becoming more mindfully aware of one's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    There are two great natural treatments for anxiety-related stomach issues:
    • Lemon balm has been used since the Middle Ages as a calming herb. Take 400 mg twice daily to prevent your stomach from reacting to your worried thoughts; available in drugstores for about $4.
    • You can also try iberogast, available in health food stores for around $20. Iberogast is a blend of plants and herbs, including caraway, chamomile, licorice, milk thistle and peppermint. Adding 20 drops to your water can sooth the receptors in your stomach when anxiety hits.

    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Passionflower is a great natural solution for nervousness because it has the same properties as some prescription medicines used to promote calmness and relaxation. It can be taken in liquid or capsule form. Both cost about $10 at vitamin or health food stores. Take 2 milliliters of this supplement three times a day.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Psychiatry, answered
    In addition to meditation, biofeedback, and hypnosis, other relaxation techniques that may ease anxiety include deep (diaphragmatic) breathing, visualization, and body scanning. Keep in mind, though, that there is little research available on the effectiveness of these techniques in treating anxiety.