Antihypertensive

Antihypertensive

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Before you decide that Clorpres (clonidine hydrochloride/chlorthalidone) is the best treatment option for your hypertension or edema, make sure to discuss any medical conditions with your doctor. Mention any allergies you have, especially if you are allergic to any other sulfate, hypertension, or diuretic medications.

    Your doctor needs to know if you have any of the following conditions: bronchial asthma; kidney or liver disease; low levels of potassium or sodium; gout (joint pain) or lupus; stroke or heart attack; vascular problems; diabetes; or any blood diseases such as porphyria. In addition, tell the doctor if you are prone to vomiting; if you are frequently exposed to very hot environments; if you are scheduled for surgery in the near future; or if you are pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant. Tell your doctor about any other medications you are taking such as other blood pressure medications, other diuretics, lithium, antidepressants, diabetes medications, dixogin, beta-blockers, barbiturates, corticosteroids, or narcotics.

    Contact your doctor right away if you become pregnant or if you need to start taking another medication during your treatment. Do not stop taking this medication without first consulting your doctor, as you may experience withdrawal side effects such as nervousness, headache, or a rapid increase in blood pressure. It is important to avoid dehydration during any diuretic treatment, as it may cause fainting if your blood pressure becomes too low. During treatment, avoid alcohol, excessive sweating, exposure to hot or humid environments, and activities that may lead to diarrhea or vomiting. Ask your doctor for more ways to control your blood pressure.
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    A answered

    Based on information from iGuard.org, a free medication monitoring service, 12% of patients experience side effects while taking Bisoprolol with Hydrochlorothiazide (Ziac). Some of the side effects reported by iGuard members include: Drowsiness, and Dizziness. Please follow up with your doctor or other healthcare provider if you are experiencing any symptoms that worsen or do not go away.

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    A Cardiac Rehabilitation, answered on behalf of

    Yes, beta blockers are commonly used in critically ill heart patients. Patients who have had a heart attack usually get beta blockers to reduce the work of the heart by slowing the heart beat down and lowering blood pressure. They have been also shown to reduce the chance for rhythm disturbances. They also can be used to treat any rhythm disturbances in patients with heart disease and to reduce the risk of heart attack in heart patients having non-heart surgery.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Before taking guanethidine, you should know some potential risks associated with this medication. Guanethidine may cause extreme dizziness, weakness or even fainting. These symptoms may be made worse by hot weather, alcohol and exercise. To avoid these side effects, be very careful while in hot weather, and avoid drinking alcohol or exercising for long periods of time. If you do start to get dizzy or lightheaded, lie down right away. You also may experience dizziness when changing positions, especially when getting out of bed in the morning. This risk is especially increased when you're changing your dosage of guanethidine. To reduce the risk of fainting or other injury, don't change positions suddenly, and don't get out of bed without assistance when you're adjusting your dosage of guanethidine.

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    A answered
    Dynacirc (isradipine) was produced by SmithKline Beecham, but the brand-name drug has been discontinued.  Generic versions, sold as isradipine, are available as 2.5 mg and 5 mg oral capsules and are produced by Actavis Totowa and Cobalt Labs, Inc. 
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    A answered
    Yes. But be sure to clear this with your doctor so that he/she can monitor you for blood pressure changes, development of edema (swelling), and other possible side effects. Procardia is usually used as a blood pressure lowering medication and many pain medications (such as morphine and synthetic morphine analogs & derivatives) can lower your blood pressure as well.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Do not use lisinopril hydrochlorothiazide if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, as it could harm your baby. If you become pregnant while using lisinopril hydrochlorothiazide, talk to your doctor right away.
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    A , Gynecology, answered
    Found in some popular cold medicines, alpha-adrenergic agonists are not designed specifically to treat incontinence. But women with stress incontinence and some men who have undergone prostate removal may find these medications help relieve their symptoms. Alpha-adrenergic agonists mimic the effects of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine, which, among other things, stimulates the muscles around the bladder neck (the junction of the bladder and the urethra) and urethra (the tube that connects the bladder to the outside of the body) to contract and form a tighter seal to keep urine in.

    One alpha-adrenergic agonist, pseudoephedrine, is an ingredient in cold and allergy remedies such as Sudafed. Some people take pseudoephedrine occasionally to minimize stress incontinence. You should check with your doctor before taking pseudoephedrine especially if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure.
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    A answered
    In fact, Tarka can cause your body to retain potassium. Blood sugars and potassium are related. Eating foods high in potassium may raise blood sugars. Some foods that are high in potassium are: bananas, potatoes, sweet potatoes. Make an appointment with your doctor to discuss your potassium and blood sugar levels and what might be causing the changes in your potassium and blood sugar levels.
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    A Cardiac Rehabilitation, answered on behalf of
    Metoprolol tartrate is a medication used to lower blood pressure.  It is a member of the beta-blocker drug family. Some reports show metoprolol tartrate may slightly increase triglycerides or decrease HDL-C, while others have not observed a difference. If these changes are observed, they are generally small in size and not meaningful. However, if the effect on lipids seems to be significant, a patient may consider trying a more "lipid neutral" medication in the beta-blocker family.