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What should I know about Glucotrol before taking it?

Before taking Glucotrol (glipizide), a drug prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes, you should know that it could cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). You should learn the warning signs of this condition, which include shakiness, nausea, dizziness, sweatiness, anxiety and hunger.

Glucotrol may also cause other side effects, such as diarrhea, bloating, stomach pain, constipation, drowsiness, headache, nervousness, rash, red or itchy skin, hives or blisters and sensitivity to sunlight. Drinking alcohol while taking Glucotrol may worsen these side effects.

Some side effects may be serious, including low blood cell counts, low levels of sodium (salt) in body fluids around the cells and inflammation of the liver. Call your doctor right away if you experience any of the following symptoms:
  • yellowing of the skin or eyes
  • light-colored stools
  • dark urine
  • pain in the upper right part of the stomach
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
Glucotrol can also interfere with other medications and worsen side effects. Be sure to talk with your doctor about all your other drugs (prescription and nonprescription), supplements and herbal remedies.

Taking Glucotrol may increase your risk for heart problems. Tell your doctor about any medical conditions you have or have had, such as kidney or liver problems, adrenal, pituitary or thyroid disorders or glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD).

Glucotrol may affect a developing fetus or nursing baby. If you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant or are breastfeeding, speak with your doctor about the possible benefits and risks of taking this drug.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.