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How do antibiotics affect good bacteria?

Joel H. Fuhrman, MD
Family Medicine
If you take antibiotics repeatedly, you diminish the population of good bacteria that protects you against the "harmful" bacteria. In addition, the "harmful" bacteria become more resistant (harder to kill with antibiotics the next time). Over 100 different helpful intestinal bacteria are lost with the use of antibiotics which then give pathogenic (disease-causing) microbes the chance to proliferate and fill the ecologic vacuum created by the repeated administration of antibiotics.
Super Immunity: The Essential Nutrition Guide for Boosting Your Body's Defenses to Live Longer, Stronger, and Disease Free

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Super Immunity: The Essential Nutrition Guide for Boosting Your Body's Defenses to Live Longer, Stronger, and Disease Free

In Super Immunity, world-renowned health expert and New York Times bestselling author of Eat to Live Dr. Joel Fuhrman offers a nutritional guide to help you live longer, stronger, and disease...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.