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How do I use intranasal lidocaine?

Dawn Marcus
Neurology
To use intranasal lidocaine, lie down and extend your head over the edge of the bed, so that your head tips back. Slowly drip 0.5 to 1 mL of 4 percent lidocaine (about 10 to 20 drops) into the nostril on the side of the headache. Repeat 2 minutes later if the headache hasn't gone away. Lidocaine nasal solution is generally well tolerated, but you may notice numbness of the nasal membranes.
The Woman's Migraine Toolkit: Managing Your Headaches from Puberty to Menopause (A DiaMedica Guide to Optimum Wellness)

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The Woman's Migraine Toolkit: Managing Your Headaches from Puberty to Menopause (A DiaMedica Guide to Optimum Wellness)

Migraines are a common, controllable type of headache that affects one in every six women, more than 20 million in the United States alone. The Woman’s Migraine Toolkit helps readers take charge of...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.