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Is there a cure for Alzheimer's disease?

Currently, there is no cure for Alzheimer's disease. Researchers are continually testing the effectiveness of various drug therapies that will control symptoms; slow, reduce and/or reverse mental and behavioral symptoms; and prevent or halt the disease. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved several medications for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease: donepezil hydrochloride (Aricept), approved for all stages of Alzheimer's disease; rivastigmine (Exelon), approved in pill and patch form for mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease; galantamine hydrobromide (Razadyne), approved for mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease; and memantine HCI (Namenda) for the treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease. Some of these medications can be used alone or in combination, and can provide some relief of symptoms and may slow the decline in mental function to some extent. The FDA has approved memantine HCI (Namenda) for the treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease, which may help slow the worsening of symptoms. Currently, research supports behavioral management interventions for individuals with dementia, as well as education, counseling and support services for caregivers.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.