Allergies Symptoms

Allergies Symptoms

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    If you suffer from allergies, you are not alone. An estimated 45 million Americans suffer from allergies. Common symptoms caused by allergies include frequent sneezing, itchy eyes, nose, or throat, stuffy nose, runny nose and post-nasal drip.

    Allergies may also play a part in disorders of the ear, nose, and throat area, such as ear infections, hoarseness, and sinusitis. Allergy symptoms can be seasonal or present year-round.

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    The symptoms of environmental allergies vary. Some common symptoms are a runny nose, watery eyes, itchy skin, congestion, and rashes. These symptoms can be experienced as mild or severe. Some allergies cause anaphylaxis, which includes constricted airway and swollen throat lining. These types of symptoms cause trouble breathing and need emergency treatment.

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    For the most part, morning throat clearing can be due to different causes, one of them being allergies. It could also be due to postnasal drainage, causing accumulation of mucus to the back of the throat and irritating the cough reflex. For the most part, postnasal drainage can also be due to allergies.
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    If you can easily identify what's triggering your skin allergies, you might not need to see a doctor-avoiding that particular allergen might be enough to avoid future allergic reactions. However, in some cases, it might not be so easy to pinpoint what is the source of your skin allergies. If that's the case, it might be best to see a doctor to determine what allergens cause a reaction for you. Also, if your skin allergy symptoms are accompanied by other symptoms such as severe swelling, difficulty breathing, or vomiting, it's important to see a doctor.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    It can be hard sometimes to figure out if you have allergies or a cold. Here are some main differences between the two:
    • The mucus produced by a cold gets thick and may turn yellow or green. Mucus is typically clear with allergies.
    • A sore throat is more common with a cold than with allergies.
    • Colds often bring on a low fever (especially in children). Allergies never cause fever.
    • Both colds and allergies can cause coughing and sneezing, but coughing is more common with colds, and sneezing is more common with allergies.
    • A cold should clear up within a week to 10 days. An allergy can drag on for as long as you're exposed to what's causing it.
    • A cold is most common in winter, while allergies can crop up any time of year.
    • Itchy eyes are a classic sign of allergies but don’t occur with colds.
    • Both colds and allergies can cause fatigue, but aches and pains usually indicate a cold or even the flu.
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    If you have a diagnosis determining what your allergy is, and you can easily control your symptoms with medication or by avoiding the allergen, you may not need to talk to your physician further. However, if your symptoms increase or are not being fully treated by your medication, talk to your doctor about your options. In addition, if your condition changes-you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, for example-speak to your physician as certain allergy medications should be avoided during pregnancy. If you are unsure about anything, always talk to your doctor.

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    Symptoms of seasonal allergies include runny nose, watery eyes, sneezing, and general malaise. If you experience these symptoms in spring or fall and they are relieved by an over-the-counter allergy medicine such as Claritin or Zyrtec, you can safely diagnose yourself with seasonal allergies.
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    There are several causes of scratchy throat, such as postnasal drainage, allergies, the common cold, and acid reflux. Treating the cause will generally help the symptom of scratchy throat. Some of the home remedies that you could employ are gurgling with salt water, drinking honey with tea, using a humidifier, and avoiding triggers if you know you have allergies.
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    A , Allergy & Immunology, answered
    You only become allergic to things after you have already been exposed to them. An allergic response cannot take place upon first exposure to an allergen; sometimes that fact provides some very poignant glimpses into people's lives. For example, we once had a teenage patient from an observant Jewish family. His general practitioner had ordered a standard battery of radioallergosorbent test (RAST) tests and when son and father arrived to hear the results, I was chagrined to find a reaction to shrimp and lobster. These delicacies are not allowed under dietary laws observed by both devout Jews and Muslims, who are restricted to eating only kosher or halal foods, respectively. Ergo, it could only be that the son had tasted forbidden fruit of the sea.

    In reviewing the results with them, my body language made the father suspicious and he asked to look at the printout himself. He said, "Doctor, it is my understanding that you only become allergic to things after you have already been exposed to them." I nodded. He turned to his son and spoke to him firmly but kindly in Yiddish. I couldn't contain my curiosity and asked him to tell me what he had said. He answered, "How did it taste?"
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    A , Allergy & Immunology, answered
    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is the main antibody seen in allergic disease. Its primary role is thought to be defending against parasites. Levels are often checked to determine the degree of allergy or atopy a patient has. Elevated levels often correlate with severe eczema.