Allergies Symptoms

Allergies Symptoms

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    A answered
    You can't control your allergies with a single approach. You've got to use every symptom-soothing tool you can. You also need to be consistent in your efforts and willing to explore new treatment options. Most of all, you need to have a step-by-step, strategic plan that keeps you organized and on track, so you can finally take control of your allergy symptoms.

    Use the following steps to lay the groundwork for your own, personalized allergy-control plan:
    • Partner with your doctor. Solid allergy relief won't come from a single visit to your doctor. Only a long-term relationship with your doctor will do -- one in which you proactively track and share your symptoms, ask the right questions and follow up if you're not getting the relief you need.
    • Get allergy-tested -- even if you've been tested before. Your allergy triggers can change with time.
    • Avoid your triggers. It's impossible to avoid all your triggers, but you should try. Minimizing exposure is the best way to prevent symptoms from flaring up.
    • Follow your medication plan. That includes sticking with any over-the-counter or prescription medications for as long as your doctor recommends. Combine your allergy medications with other sinus-soothing steps to speed your relief.
    • Live a healthy lifestyle. Kick bad habits, such as smoking, drinking too much alcohol or eating inflammation-inducing junk food.
    • Don't forget the TLC. Saline sprays, neti pots, humidifiers and other self-care remedies provide extra layers of allergy-symptom relief, so don't skip this step.
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    There are several causes of scratchy throat, such as postnasal drainage, allergies, the common cold, and acid reflux. Treating the cause will generally help the symptom of scratchy throat. Some of the home remedies that you could employ are gurgling with salt water, drinking honey with tea, using a humidifier, and avoiding triggers if you know you have allergies.
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    A , Allergy & Immunology, answered
    If the air is completely free of the substances an allergic patient is sensitive to, there will be no allergy symptoms. If someone is dust sensitive, for example, and moves to the top of the Swiss Alps where the air is very clean, cold, and dry, her allergic symptoms will disappear. Similarly, if a cat-sensitive asthmatic gives away his cat, his asthma often improves dramatically.
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    Allergy symptoms can occur once a month. Allergies are related to exposure to things that are irritants. If you are exposed to them more than once a month you are likely to experience symptoms more frequently. If you are only exposed to irritants infrequently, such as when visiting a home with cats or dogs, you may only experience symptoms during those times.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Dr. Oz - puffy eyes

    If allergies are making your eyes puffy, forget the concealers and the foundation -- it's more effective to wipe away the pollen that's causing the problem, says allergy specialist and Dr. Oz Show guest Clifford Bassett. In this video, Dr. Bassett tells Dr. Oz about a product that makes it easy.


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    If you can easily identify what's triggering your skin allergies, you might not need to see a doctor-avoiding that particular allergen might be enough to avoid future allergic reactions. However, in some cases, it might not be so easy to pinpoint what is the source of your skin allergies. If that's the case, it might be best to see a doctor to determine what allergens cause a reaction for you. Also, if your skin allergy symptoms are accompanied by other symptoms such as severe swelling, difficulty breathing, or vomiting, it's important to see a doctor.

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    For the most part, morning throat clearing can be due to different causes, one of them being allergies. It could also be due to postnasal drainage, causing accumulation of mucus to the back of the throat and irritating the cough reflex. For the most part, postnasal drainage can also be due to allergies.
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    Common symptoms include raised bumps across the exposed skin. The affected areas might itch and appear red and swollen, too.

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    A Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    How Do I Know If an Insect Bite Gave Me an Allergic Reaction?
    Redness, swelling and hives are just a few indicators of an allergic reaction to an insect bite. In this video, emergency medicine physician, David Feldman, MD, of Good Samaritan Hospital, describes other symptoms to watch for.
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    A Allergy & Immunology, answered on behalf of
    Allergy symptoms are not the same as allergies. When someone says they have allergies they often mean they have allergy symptoms: itchy, sneezy, runny or stuffy nose; itchy red or watery eyes or any combination of these. Only 25 percent of people who have allergy symptoms actually have allergies (and just one-third of those people who actually say they have allergies have them).

    There are three main causes of allergy symptoms: allergic rhinitis, irritant rhinitis or a combination of both (called mixed rhinitis). Allergic rhinitis is caused by a component of your immune system called the immunoglobin E (IgE) antibody. If you have allergic rhinitis, triggers like seasonal pollen, pets, dust mites, or even cockroaches cause the IgE immune system to react just like your immune system would react against a virus or bacteria.

    Irritant rhinitis, or nonallergic rhinitis, is a direct irritation of your nose. In this case, something bothers the inside surface of the nose and causes allergy symptoms. Sometimes there is a local “dumb” or innate immune response as the cause of allergy symptoms. And sometimes it is a nerve response that causes the irritant allergy symptoms. But in each case, the cause of nonallergic rhinitis is not the full immune response seen as the cause of allergic rhinitis, but a more local response.