Allergies Causes & Risk Factors

Allergies Causes & Risk Factors

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    Like all types of allergies, skin allergies can be influenced by genetics. Usually, the chances of developing a skin allergy increase if one or both parents have any type of allergy. This is because people don't always develop the same type of allergies as their parents. For example, parents with seasonal allergies may have a child with skin allergies, or parents with skin allergies might have a child with respiratory allergies.

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    While some foods may help ease allergy symptoms, others may aggravate them. Research suggests that alcohol, refined grains, red and cured meats and foods high in saturated fat and sugar can worsen allergy symptoms by worsening inflammation.

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    Most skin allergies are not contagious. This is because allergic reactions are caused by the unique response of each individual's immune system. Substances that cause a reaction in one person may not cause a reaction in someone else, even if both people have the same skin condition. Most of the time, hives and rashes caused by skin allergies won't even spread to other parts of the same person's body, let alone parts of someone else's body.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    It's not just mold and mildew (both allergens in their own right) that thrive in moist, warm environments. Dust mites are big fans, too. Buy a hygrometer to measure the moisture in your home, and if necessary, purchase dehumidifiers to tackle moisture trouble spots.
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    How old you are when you're exposed is critical, and viruses may also play a role. Recent studies show that heavy exposure early in life - before age 2 - may be protective against animal allergies and asthma.
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    Antigens that cause an allergic reaction are called allergens. Some common allergens include bee or insect venom, certain antibiotics, pollen, animal dander, and sulfa drugs.
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    The Food and Drug Administration estimates that there are approximately 36 million people in the United States who suffer from seasonal allergies. This condition is also called by its common name of hay fever, or, by its technical name, allergic rhinitis.

    While it may provide little comfort, the pollen that you are reacting to is actually harmless. The runny noses, scratchy eyes and headaches you endure actually result from a case of mistaken identity.

    Your body believes that the pollen in the air is actually dust mites or fungal spores. In response, it releases histamine - a natural chemical that is part of the body's immune system response. The histamine causes irritation and inflammation of the soft tissue, which results in your sniffling and other symptoms.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Heaters are one of the main reasons for winter allergies. When the furnace turns on, it doesn't just circulate warm air around the house - it spews out all the dust, mold and insect parts that have collected in the heating vents. If left unattended, this problem can lead to an entire season of headaches, sneezing and coughing. The solution is a simple one: heating vent filters should be high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters when possible, and should be changed at least once every 3 months.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    Some people may develop skin reactions as a result of photosensitivity, or sun allergies. These people usually develop red, itchy patches of bumps or hives on their skin after being exposed to sunlight. Depending on the severity of the allergy, hives can develop after a few hours or only a few minutes of sun exposure. Usually, this kind of allergic reaction is caused by certain diseases or skin conditions, or develops only if a person is taking certain medications that increase sensitivity to sunlight. The best treatment for a skin allergy caused by sunlight is to avoid sunlight as much as possible, and to wear protective clothing and sunscreen when exposed to the sun.

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    There's more to developing allergies than just heredity. The things that you become allergic to are also based on when you're exposed to a substance and how much of it you're exposed to.

    Let's say, for example, that you have a tendency to be allergic to mold spores. You may have no allergy symptoms when you are living all alone in your spic 'n' span apartment complex. Then a new roommate moves in, bringing along a veritable jungle of houseplants, an smelly old mattress, and a humidifier (to keep her skin moist). Soon after her arrival, you become a symphony of snorts and sneezes. What happened? You'd endured a certain small amount of exposure to mold spores with no problem, but once the scales were tipped by the hefty onslaught of your roommate's mold-bearing possessions, your immune system kicked itself into high gear.