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What is low-risk drinking?

Low-risk drinking is defined as drinking within the recommended limits published by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). For men up to the age of 65, these limits are no more than four drinks in one day and no more than 14 drinks in a week. For nonpregnant women up to the age of 65, and for both healthy men and women over the age of 65, the recommended limits are no more than three drinks in one day and no more than seven drinks in a week.

Pregnant women or women who may become pregnant should not consume any alcohol.

A standard drink is any drink that contains about 14 grams of pure alcohol (about 0.6 fluid ounces or 1.2 tablespoons). This is equivalent to one 12-ounce bottle of beer or wine cooler; 8 to 9 ounces of malt liquor; one 5-ounce glass of table wine; or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits. Keep in mind that the alcohol content of different types of beer, wine and distilled spirits can vary quite substantially.

The NIAAA also recommends having some days with no drinking. If people drink within these limits, they will reduce the chances of developing an alcohol use disorder and related health problems.

This content originally appeared on HealthyWomen.org.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.