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Can treating HIV reduce the rate of AIDS-related cancers?

Dr. Jeanne Morrison, PhD
Family Practitioner
The widespread use of anti-HIV medication has slowed the rate of some AIDS-related cancers, but not others. Anti-HIV medication can cut the amount of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) in the bloodstream, allowing the person's immune system to partly recover from the weakening effects of HIV. This can help the body fight off cancer cells.

Today, fewer and fewer people are developing two of the most common AIDS-related cancers: non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Kaposi sarcoma. However, the widespread use of anti-HIV medication has not reduced the rate of other AIDS-related cancers, including cervical cancer, anal cancer, and Hodgkin lymphoma. An increasing incidence of primary central nervous system lymphoma has also been noted.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.