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How does my white blood cell count affect my risk for AIDS-related cancers?

If you have HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), a high white blood cell count can reduce your risk of developing AIDS-related cancer. For example, Kaposi sarcoma - a common AIDS-related cancer - usually strikes people with white blood cell counts (also called CD4 counts) under 200 to 300. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma usually strikes when the count dips below 100, and primary central nervous system lymphoma occurs most often when the count falls below 50.

Continue Learning about AIDS-Related Cancers

What are AIDS-related cancers?
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People with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are more likely than other people to develop certain ...
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Should I talk to my doctor about my AIDS-related cancer symptoms?
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If you have HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) and notice symptoms that may be signs of cancer, you ...
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Are AIDS-related cancers contagious?
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You cannot catch any type of cancer from another person. Cancer develops in the cells of the body an...
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How are AIDS-related cancers diagnosed?
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Doctors use different tests to diagnose different AIDS-related cancers. For example:Lymphoma may req...
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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.