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Why should my child with ADHD know that I'm advocating for her at school?

Each time you advocate for changes in your attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) child’s instruction at school, you should let your child know what you’re doing and why you are doing it. In this way, your child will grow to feel that you are on her side and not an antagonist. The power of her feeling that she is supported cannot be overstated. As your child feels that you are advocating for her interests, her motivation to do well in school and to work hard will be increased. In addition, by advocating on her behalf, you are communicating to her that her differences are not deficits, and that she has strengths. Your child will internalize the good feelings that you convey when you advocate for her and when you take action to change the environment rather than just try to change her. As you place some of the blame for her failures on the school environment, you can reverse the self-blame and self-defeating thoughts that have come to plague your child.
The Gift of ADHD: How to Transform Your Child's Problems into Strengths

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The Gift of ADHD: How to Transform Your Child's Problems into Strengths

As a parent, you already know that your child has many gifts. What you may not know is that attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) related symptoms—the very qualities that lead him or her...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.