Riverside Center for Neurosciences

Our Mission

Riverside Center for Neurosciences specializes in rapid-response diagnosis and treatment of brain, spine and neurological conditions including stroke, brain tumors, back pain, head injuries, memory loss, sleep disorders, back pain, and diseases such as ALS, Parkinson’s, MS and Alzheimer’s. We offer the reassurance of local, non-surgical interventions to treat aneurysms and clots and are recognized world-wide as experts in using Gamma Knife, the only radiation technology available in Hampton Roads designed exclusively for treating the brain.

Activity

  • Riverside Center for Neurosciences
    In some women, birth control pills improve migraine. The pills may help reduce the number of attacks and their attacks may become less severe. But in other women, the pills may worsen their migraines. In still other women, taking birth control pills has no effect on their migraines.

    The reason for these...Read More
  • Riverside Center for Neurosciences
    If you think you get migraine headaches, talk with your doctor. Before your appointment, write down:
    • how often you have headaches
    • where the pain is
    • how long the headaches last
    • when the headaches happen, such as during your period
    • other symptoms, such as nausea or blind spots
    • any family
    ...Read More
  • Riverside Center for Neurosciences
    There are two ways to approach the treatment of a migraine headache with drugs: prevent the attacks, or relieve the symptoms during the attacks. Many people use both approaches by taking medications originally developed for epilepsy and depression to prevent future migraine attacks, and treating...Read More
  • Riverside Center for Neurosciences
    The best way to prevent migraine is to find out what triggers your attacks and avoid or limit these triggers. Since migraine headaches are more common during times of stress, finding healthy ways to cut down on and cope with stress might help. Talk with your doctor about starting a fitness program...Read More
  • Riverside Center for Neurosciences
    Ask your doctor about what migraine medicines are safe to take while breastfeeding. Some medicines can be passed through breast milk and might be harmful to your baby.

    This answer is based on source information from the National Women's Health Information Center. Read More
  • Riverside Center for Neurosciences
    Occipital neuralgia is not a life-threatening condition. Many individuals improve with therapy involving heat, rest, anti-inflammatory medications, and muscle relaxants. Recovery is usually complete after the bout of pain has ended and the nerve damage repaired or lessened.

    This answer is based...Read More
  • Riverside Center for Neurosciences
    Sometimes, headache can signal a more serious problem. You should talk to your doctor about your headaches if:
    • You have several headaches per month and each lasts for several hours or days.
    • Your headaches disrupt your home, work, or school life.
    • You have nausea, vomiting, vision, or other
    ...Read More
  • Riverside Center for Neurosciences
    As people age, bone strength and muscle elasticity and tone tend to decrease. The discs begin to lose fluid and flexibility, which decreases their ability to cushion the vertebrae and causes back pain.
    Pain can occur when, for example, one lifts something too heavy or overstretches, causing a sprain,...Read More
  • Riverside Center for Neurosciences
    The outcome for coma and persistent vegetative state depends on the cause, severity, and site of neurological damage. Individuals may emerge from coma with a combination of physical, intellectual, and psychological difficulties that need special attention. Recovery usually occurs gradually, with...Read More
  • Riverside Center for Neurosciences

    There is no cure or standard course of treatment for Bell's palsy. The most important factor in treatment is to eliminate the source of the nerve damage.

    Bell's palsy affects each individual differently. Some cases are mild and do not require treatment because the symptoms usually subside

    ...Read More
  • Riverside Center for Neurosciences

    Keep in mind that one woman’s pain is another woman’s discomfort as pain tolerance can vary considerably form one person to another. Some women manage the discomfort of labor by using prepared childbirth techniques, the birthing ball, warm showers, and/or systemic medication administered through an IV.

    ...Read More
  • Riverside Center for Neurosciences
    During the third stage of labor, you will deliver the placenta and membranes that have nourished and contained your baby throughout your pregnancy. These contractions are milder – you deserve a break at this point – and usually happen within 30 minutes after the birth of the baby Read More
  • Riverside Center for Neurosciences
    During the second stage of labor, you will push the baby down the birth canal and out into the world. This stage usually lasts 15 to 75 minutes but can last as long as 2 to 3 hours or even more depending on several factors including previous births, the position of the baby’s head and the size of...Read More
  • Riverside Center for Neurosciences
    During the first stage of labor, the cervix dilates and should be opened to a full 10 centimeters at the end of this stage. The first stage is typically the longest part of labor and can last several hours. Generally, a woman experiencing her first labor can expect to progress about one centimeter an...Read More
  • Riverside Center for Neurosciences

    Today, myasthenia gravis can be controlled. There are several therapies available to help reduce and improve muscle weakness. Medications used to treat the disorder include anticholinesterase agents, such as neostigmine and pyridostigmine, which help improve neuromuscular transmission and increase

    ...Read More