NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

Our Mission

NewYork-Presbyterian, an academic medical center located in New York City, offers expert care in nearly every medical specialty. It’s ranked among the top 10 hospitals by US News’ "America's Best Hospitals" survey. Additionally, our doctors conduct medical research through our two affiliated medical colleges: Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons and Weill Cornell Medical College.

Activity

  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    How is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) performed?

    A person receiving TMS is awake and no anesthesia is required. The patient sits comfortably in a chair for approximately 30 minutes, during which time a magnetic coil is placed on the head in a specifically targeted region – the prefrontal cortex. The patient will feel a tapping on the head and will...Read More
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    What is the treatment for attention disorders?

    For nearly six decades, many children with attention disorders have benefited from being treated with medication. Three drugs, Ritalin (methylphenidate), Dexedrine (dextroamphetamine), and Cylert (pemoline), have been used successfully. Although these drugs are stimulants in the same category as "speed"and "diet pi...Read More
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    What are some fireworks safety tips?

    Fireworks add festivity to a Fourth of July celebration, but a public fireworks display is safer and more dazzling than trying to do it yourself. Keep in mind that:
    • Fireworks and sparklers should be handled by trained professionals. Sparklers can get as hot as 1,200 degrees!
    • Stay at least 500
    ...Read More
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    How is rehabilitation used to treat Parkinson's disease?

    Physical, occupational, speech, swallowing, and nutrition therapy can all help people with Parkinson's disease maintain function over time. Rehabilitation experts will:
    • Evaluate muscle strength and motor skills and develop an individualized program to maintain existing motor function.
    • Improve
    ...Read More
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    What is a sleeve gastrectomy?

    Sleeve Gastrectomy is a new, minimally invasive procedure that is performed in under an hour and carries with it a reduced chance of leakage, infection, and bleeding, compared to other weight-loss surgeries. It restricts food intake by the removal of about 60% of the stomach, so that the stomach is reduced...Read More
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    What is robotic radical prostatectomy?

    A radical prostatectomy is a surgery for prostate cancer that involves removal of the entire prostate gland and some surrounding tissue. In a robotic radical prostatectomy, small cuts are made in the stomach and a flexible lighted tube containing the video camera and thin instruments are inserted...Read More
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    What is Marfan syndrome?

    Marfan's syndrome is a genetic disorder of the connective tissues that can affect the skeleton, eyes, heart, or blood vessels. People with Marfan's syndrome are at risk of developing a bulge in a weakened spot in the aorta, the main blood vessel that carries blood from the heart to the rest of the...Read More
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    What is stomach cancer?

    Each year, 22,000 Americans are diagnosed with gastric cancer (stomach cancer). This disease, which begins in the cells lining the innermost, or mucosal layer of the stomach and spreads outward, is relatively rare in the US but the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. Gastric...Read More
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    What is celiac disease?

    Celiac disease (CD), also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is an inflammatory autoimmune disease in which eating gluten, a component of certain grains – (wheat, rye, and barley) – results in the destruction of the small intestine's villi, small fingerlike structures which are responsible for ab...Read More
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    What causes conduct disorder?

    The conditions that contribute to the development of conduct disorder are considered to be multifactorial, with many factors (multifactorial) contributing to the cause. Neuropsychological testing has shown that children and adolescents with conduct disorders seem to have an impairment in the frontal...Read More
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    What are the symptoms of fecal incontinence?

    Fecal incontinence is characterized by an inability to control bowel movements. Symptoms of fecal incontinence are not being able to hold a bowel movement until one reaches the bathroom, or an unexpected leakage of stool or gas. Read More
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    What is the role of the gallbladder in digestion?

    The gallbladder is a small sac located under the liver which stores and concentrates bile, which is produced in the liver. The gallbladder releases bile, which helps digest fat, into the upper small intestine after eating – especially fats. Read More
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    What is external snapping hip syndrome?

    External snapping hip syndrome is a feeling that the hip is dislocating, which is often caused by joint laxity. The laxity results in the tightening of muscles surrounding the joint, to stabilize the pelvis and results in the iliotibial band snapping over the greater trochanteric (prominence on the...Read More
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    How are brain aneurysms treated?

    Doctors determine the best treatment for each aneurysm patient by weighing factors including the patient's age and overall health and the size, shape, and location of the aneurysm. Treatment options include:
    • Endovascular coiling or embolization: In this minimally invasive approach, surgeons fill the aneurysm
    ...Read More
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

    What is chronotherapeutics?

    A person's internal biological rhythms are vulnerable to drifting away from local day and night, causing problems with mood, energy and sleep. Chronotherapeutics uses such therapies as bright light therapy, dawn-dusk simulation, and melatonin to resynchronize the internal clock. In many cases this...Read More