Johns Hopkins Medicine

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For over a century, Johns Hopkins has been the model for medical research, teaching and patient care. We continue to build on the promise of medicine through innovation, collaboration and compassion. The promise of medicine is being fulfilled right now, in the place where modern medicine was born. Visit us at www.hopkinsmedicine.org or call 855-884-6754.

**The content provided on this site by Johns Hopkins Medicine is for educational and informational purposes only. For medical advice and diagnosis, please see your personal healthcare provider.**



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  • Johns Hopkins Medicine
    The CPCU, or Cardiac Progressive Care Unit, is where you will be extensively rehabilitated after a VAD implant surgery.

    A ventricular assist device (VAD) is a pump that assists a failing ventricle (one of the heart's lower chambers) by pumping blood to the body. These devices are also used as...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine
    Lupus affects each person differently -- you may experience a totally different set of symptoms from someone else suffering from the disease.

    That is why treatment varies from person to person. Treatment for your own case may vary over the course of your life, since the symptoms can change. Your...Read More
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  • Johns Hopkins Medicine
    Heart disease may reveal itself differently in a woman because a woman’s heart functions differently from a man’s in certain ways.

    A woman’s heart and blood vessels are smaller than a man’s, and a woman’s heart beats faster. In addition, hormonal changes make women more likely to have heart pa...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine
    Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal dystrophy, also called Fuchs' dystrophy or simply FECD, is a disorder that affects the cornea of the eye, especially the inner layer, called the endothelium. Among other things, Fuchs' (pronounced FOOKS) dystrophy robs the eye of its ability to obtain nutrients, causing...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine
    Blood pressure is measured with two numbers: systolic (the top number in a reading) and diastolic (the bottom number). If your doctor says your blood pressure is 120/80, 120 is the systolic number; 80 is the diastolic number.

    Systolic pressure refers to the force of blood against the walls of the a...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine
    Heredity, pregnancy, hormones, weight gain, trauma, long periods of standing and sitting, have been implicated as predisposing factors for superficial leg (or spider) veins. Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine
    Suppressing the immune system decreases the chances of the body’s rejecting the new heart or heart-lung, but it also decreases the body’s ability to fight infection.

    These steps will reduce the risk of infection while in the hospital:
    • All family members and personnel should follow strict h
    ...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine
    There are certain risk factors that predispose people to develop varicose veins. To name a few, these risk factors can include female gender and increase in age. Learn more from Johns Hopkins Medicine about varicose veins. Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine
    Mentoplasty is another name for chin surgery. A well defined chin helps give balance to the face and creates a major part of one's profile. Mentoplasty, or chin augmentation, is used to enhance the profile and/or facial contours and balance. This can be achieved by:
    • Inserting an implant
    • Moving
    ...Read More
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  • Johns Hopkins Medicine
    During the first month following eyelid or browlift surgery, the dramatic swelling that you experienced during the first 48 hours will shrink fairly quickly. The bruising is typically gone by two to three weeks after the procedure.

    During the first month you may notice some irregularities. These...Read More
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  • Johns Hopkins Medicine
    You might have facial plastic surgery if you have become unhappy with one or more features on your face. Facial plastic surgery is used to correct those features and give you a better quality of life. Sometimes these features have changed because of aging or for some other reason such as trauma or...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine
    After the surgery, your doctor will tell you that you can expect certain typical reactions:
    • Pain and fatigue -- You are likely to have some pain, swelling, and bruising after the procedure, and feel very tired. Your doctor will give you a prescription for pain medicine.
    • Nausea and vomiting
    ...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine
    Your doctor will discuss with you how to prepare for your browlift or eyelid surgery. In order to minimize the risks to surgery, it is very important that you follow these instructions:
    • Do not take any of the following for at least 14 days prior to surgery:
      • Aspirin or aspirin containing
    ...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine
    You and your doctor will discuss whether you are a good candidate for ear reshaping, or otoplasty. The goal of otoplasty is to surgically correct protruding or deformed ears. Otoplasty will not alter hearing ability. What is important for successful otoplasty is that the ears be in proportion to...Read More