HealthyWomen

Our Mission

HealthyWomen is the nation's leading nonprofit health information source for women. Our mission is to educate, inform and empower women to make smart health choices for themselves and their families.

For 25 years, HealthyWomen has been providing unbiased, original health information, reviewed and vetted by leading medical experts -- earning the trust of consumers, health care providers, nonprofit and corporate partners, and the media. In July our website HealthyWomen.org was selected to ForbesWoman’s "Top 100 Websites for Women" for the third consecutive year.

In addition to our site, HealthyWomen produces print publications for health care providers, the annual WomenTALK® survey addressing current trends in women’s health, as well as public health education campaigns designed to raise awareness of conditions most affecting women.

Activity

  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    There is no single answer to the question of how long it takes for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to cause acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), because it depends on many factors. These include a person's health status and his or her health-related behaviors.

    Before antiretroviral therapy...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    One approach to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention that is gaining support is called the ABC approach, in which A stands for abstinence or delay of sexual activity, B for being faithful and C for condom use. This idea implies monogamy and reductions in casual sex and multiple sexual pa...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    The risk of transmitting genital herpes to a fetus varies greatly, depending on when a woman is infected. A pregnant woman who develops a first episode of genital herpes during her pregnancy is at highest risk of passing the virus to her fetus and may be at higher risk for premature delivery.

    If a mother...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    When cooking meat, keep in mind that poultry poses one of the biggest risks of food poisoning because it can carry Salmonella bacteria. Be sure to keep this meat refrigerated until you're ready to cook it, and grill or roast until the internal temperature reaches 165 degrees Fahrenheit as measured...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    It's not uncommon for an outdoor cook to stash side dishes like potato salad or coleslaw on the table while grilling up the main events, but the sun is likely to wreak havoc on mayonnaise-based sides. Keep these dishes (or the jar of mayo) in the fridge or in a cooler until you're ready to serve...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    Bug repellents that contain the chemicals DEET or picaridin can do a lot to keep mosquitoes at bay, and, when used properly, have been deemed safe for children ages 2 months and older, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. That means you'll need to read the label and follow instructions...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    Summer is grilling season for most of us, but all that sizzle and smoke on the grill can contribute cancer-causing chemicals to food. Those heat-generated chemicals have been linked to breast, stomach, prostate and colon cancer.

    There are two cancer-related risk factors from grilling. Whether you're...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    The main concern with gestational diabetes is that the baby may develop a fetal macrosomia, a condition in which it grows more than nine pounds, four ounces before birth, regardless of its gestational age. This occurs because the baby is getting large amounts of glucose from the mother, which triggers...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    There are several types of bariatric surgery:
    • Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB): In this procedure, sometimes known as "stomach stapling," the stomach is reduced to the size of a golf ball. The stomach is divided into a large portion and a small portion. The small portion is sewn or stapled together
    ...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    Like other forms of diabetes, gestational diabetes can be managed once it is diagnosed. The goal is to keep your blood sugar levels within normal ranges (less than 95 mg/dL when fasting, less than 130 to 140 mg/dL one hour after eating).

    You can usually do this by following a specific diet high...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    Gestational diabetes almost always disappears after you deliver your baby, although your risk for developing diabetes later will then be increased. A very small percentage of women continue to have diabetes after delivery, so your blood sugar will be assessed two to six weeks after the birth to make...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    Approximately 66.3% of American adults are either overweight (defined as having a body mass index [BMI] between 25 and 29.9) or obese (defined as having a BMI of 30 or more), according to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a nationally representative sample of the U.S. population....Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    Gestational diabetes almost always disappears after you deliver your baby, although your risk for developing diabetes later will then be increased. A very small percentage of women continue to have diabetes after delivery, so your blood sugar will be assessed two to six weeks after the birth to make...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    The main concern with gestational diabetes is that the baby may develop a fetal macrosomia, a condition in which it grows more than nine pounds, four ounces before birth, regardless of its gestational age. This occurs because the baby is getting large amounts of glucose from the mother, which triggers...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    Like other forms of diabetes, gestational diabetes can be managed once it is diagnosed. The goal is to keep your blood sugar levels within normal ranges (less than 95 mg/dL when fasting, less than 130 to 140 mg/dL one hour after eating).

    You can usually do this by following a specific diet high...Read More