Challenge America

Our Mission

Challenge America answers the question of "When it happens, where do we go?" for returning military and their families. By working with communities across the country to link new and existing services, and by supporting the development of recreational, occupational and housing programs, Challenge America is able to better serve those individuals in their home communities with resources searchable by zip code.

Activity

  • Challenge America
    Challenge America answered:
    Serious burns that go deep into the subcutaneous fat and tissues and also injure the muscle are called fourth-degree burns. For coding purposes, fourth-degree burns that end in major deep tissue injury and require amputation are called fifth-degree burns.
     Trying to determine if a major burn is third, fourth...Read More
  • Challenge America
    Challenge America answered:
    Fibromyalgia is a condition characterized by widespread (on both sides of the body and above and below the waist) stiffness and pain lasting longer than three months. Additional symptoms may include abnormal pain, headaches,  numbness in hands and feet, sleep disturbance, fatigue and psyc...Read More
  • Challenge America
    Challenge America answered:
    Social phobia is a type of anxiety disorder, and anxiety disorders in general are treated with either psychotherapy, medication, or preferably a combination of both. The preferred psychotherapy treatment for veterans with social phobia is group CBT (cognitive-behavioral therapy). The cognitive part...Read More
  • Challenge America
    Challenge America answered:
    Panic disorder is a type of anxiety disorder, and anxiety disorders in general are treated with either psychotherapy, medication, or preferably a combination of both. The psychotherapy approach most recommended for panic disorder is CBT, or cognitive-behavioral therapy. The cognitive part of CBT...Read More
  • Challenge America
    Challenge America answered:
    Family members are very important in helping a veteran deal with anxiety disorder. The best course of action  is for the family to support their veteran without contributing to the veteran’s anxiety symptoms. Keep in mind that your veteran might feel embarrassment or stigma about having anxiety d...Read More
  • Challenge America
    Challenge America answered:
    When a veteran experiences anxiety disorder, it could be due to a number of factors. It may be caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain, social stressors, or genetic predisposition. Some researchers believe that negative life experiences, such as poverty, abuse, or exposure to violence can lead...Read More
  • Challenge America
    Challenge America answered:
    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is constant worry or fear that either has little or no basis in reality, or is not related to any event or situation in particular. The symptoms of GAD in veterans include:
    • muscle tension
    • restlessness
    • insomnia
    • fatigue
    • irritability
    • inability to conc
    ...Read More
  • Challenge America
    Challenge America answered:
    Normal anxiety is your body’s alarm system to alert you to danger. But in veterans who suffer from anxiety disorder, these physical signals are out of control: your mind races, your palms sweat, heart beats faster and you feel fearful when there is no actual danger. There are several types of anxiety...Read More
  • Challenge America
    Challenge America answered:
    First of all, any activity or sport that you did before your injury is possible to do again. Any!

    You may need to find adaptive equipment and some folks to support you to learn and be safe, but anything is possible. Go online to usparalympics.org and plug in your zip code and the sports you are...Read More
  • Challenge America
    Challenge America answered:
    Wheelchair basketball, hand cycling, sled hockey, and swimming are the most developed adaptive sports that already have teams, clubs, and opportunities to start and learn in the USA. This is because the sports and their activities are built around a club system, and these activities are easy to integrate with...Read More
  • Challenge America
    Challenge America answered:
    Not everyone has experience in communicating with people with disabilities. Please remember that appropriate etiquette is based primarily upon consideration and respect.

    Below are some general suggestions for communication and things to keep in mind when interacting with those with combat-related...Read More
  • Challenge America
    Challenge America answered:
    Don't be embarrassed if you happen to use accepted, common expressions such as "See you later" or "Did you hear about that?" that seem to relate to a person's disability. Don't be afraid to ask questions when you're unsure of what to do.

    If you make a mistake, it's okay. Apologize, learn from...Read More
  • Challenge America
    Challenge America answered:
    Not everyone has experience in communicating with people with disabilities. Please remember that appropriate etiquette is based primarily upon consideration and respect.

    Below are some general suggestions for communication and things to keep in mind when interacting with those with combat-related...Read More
  • Challenge America
    Challenge America answered:
    When your stress and chronic pain escalate over time, they can create even further problems, such as difficulty sleeping leading to constant fatigue, an inability to exercise leading to poor aerobic and physical fitness, difficulty concentrating from the side effects of medications leading to poor perf...Read More
  • Challenge America
    Challenge America answered:
    Any traumatic or life-threatening event can lead to post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). For instance, if a blast or explosion during combat resulted in a third-degree burn or worse, this could easily lead to PTSD.

    Symptoms of PTSD include reliving the trauma or experience, feeling detached, and...Read More