Our Mission

AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that helps people 50+ have independence, choice and control in ways that are beneficial and affordable to them and society as a whole.

Activity

  • AARP
    AARP answered:
    At least an extra 1 percent of the national average premium will be added to your premium for each month that you delay and are without creditable drug coverage, and you will pay the penalty (which increases each year, along with the average premium) for as long as you have Medicare drug coverage. In other words,...Read More
  • AARP
    AARP answered:
    If you can’t afford to pay for your prescriptions, you should check to see if you are eligible for the program called Extra Help through Medicare. People who qualify for the largest amount of Extra Help pay nothing for their Medicare drug plan premium and deductible, and only $2.50 per generic pr...Read More
  • AARP
    AARP answered:
    Are you starting to forget more? Your brain might be fine: Your medications might be impeding your memory. Older antidepressants, antidiuretics and antihistamines block a critical brain chemical from doing its job. Ask your doctor if your medications might be contributing to memory problems. Read More
  • AARP
    AARP answered:
    Yes. Dissolve ¼ to ½ a teaspoon of salt in 8 ounces of warm water. Salt helps draw out excess fluid from the throat’s inflamed tissues. Gargle a few times a day to relieve cold symptoms. Read More
  • AARP
    AARP answered:
    Medicare is a federal health insurance program for those 65 and older. It was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson in July 1965 as a way to help older adults pay their medical expenses. (Medicaid, the federally run health insurance program for low-income people, was created at the same...Read More
  • AARP
    AARP answered:
    Generally, once you have a Medicare Advantage plan, you don’t need or can’t use a Medicare Supplemental or Medigap policy.
    If you already have a Medigap policy, you cannot use it to pay for out-of-pocket costs under your Medicare Advantage plan. Read More
  • AARP
    AARP answered:
    Replace the olive oil in your favorite vinaigrette with walnut oil. Walnut oil, which is chock-full of brain-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, cuts brain inflammation, a precursor to many cognitive problems. It also keeps oxygen-rich blood flowing to your brain by thinning the blood slightly.
     Read More
  • AARP
    AARP answered:
    Medicare generally won’t cover your health care costs while you’re traveling outside the U.S. (Read the fine print in the "Important Information" section of your U.S. passport sometime. It’s actually mentioned there.) That’s why some people with Medicare decide to buy a Medigap or other supplemental...Read More
  • AARP
    AARP answered:
    Switching hands may be uncomfortable, but doing tasks with your nondominant hand such as writing, operating a computer mouse and brushing your teeth can activate parts of the brain that aren't easily triggered otherwise. Anything that requires the brain to pay close attention to a formerly automatic...Read More
  • AARP
    AARP answered:
    In most situations, to qualify for Medicare's full range of benefits, you need to be 65 and have earned the required "quarters" of coverage. This generally means you are eligible if you or your spouse worked — and paid Medicare and Social Security payroll taxes — for at least 10 years. However, if you’re...Read More
  • AARP
    AARP answered:
    You don't have to be a linguist to benefit from learning a new language. Adopting a foreign tongue boosts the verbal, language and memory parts of the brain. And, with perseverance, you can pick up a language at any age. Read More
    Robert Harris like this.
  • AARP
    AARP answered:
    Yes. Volunteer to answer questions at the library, arboretum, museum or hospital. Playing tour guide forces you to learn new facts and think on your feet, helping to form new neural pathways in your brain. What's more, interacting with others can ease stress that depletes memory. Read More
    Robert Harris like this.
  • AARP
    AARP answered:
    The gap will gradually narrow until it disappears in 2020. If you reach the doughnut hole next year, you’ll get a 50 percent discount on brand-name prescription drugs and a 7 percent discount on generic prescription drugs while you are in the coverage gap.
     
    This means you will not have to pay...Read More
  • AARP
    AARP answered:
    Get support for stressors. You may love your ailing family member, but the chronic stress of facing the situation alone can shrink your brain's memory center. Interacting with others activates many parts of the brain — and learning new ways of coping forms new neural connections. Read More
  • AARP
    AARP answered:
    Choose a side. Talk sports, business or politics. If you can do it without getting angry, which raises the memory-hindering hormone cortisol, engaging in a good debate can form new neural pathways and force you to think quickly and formulate your thoughts clearly. Read More