Cut Down on Screen Time to Promote Your Child’s Development

Less screen time can improve brain development in your child.

Cut Down on Screen Time to Promote Your Child’s Development

A study from the University of Calgary found that a child’s rapidly developing brain and thirst to learn new things come to a halt when he or she is stuck in front of a digital screen performing repetitive tasks day after day.

Researchers tracked one set of 36-month-olds who logged 25 hours per week of screen time, and another set of 36-month-olds who logged 11 hours weekly. (In the US, on average, children spend more than 16 hours a week looking at screens.) They then examined developmental test results in the same children at 60 months and found that those with increased screen times showed poorer performances on developmental testing. The same held true for 24-month-olds tested again at 36 months.

Mom, Dad, it’s not enough to cut down on a kid’s screen time. Replace it with learning opportunities like reading a book or going on an adventure. It means a lot to a child’s growth to spend face-to-face time with you!

Medically reviewed in September 2019.

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