Troy Taylor, NASM Elite Trainer

Bio

Hi, my name is Troy Taylor and here is a "quick" background.  Fitness began for me in 1988 as a member of my high school football and track teams.  My high school had implemented a mandatory weight training program and I learned an early appreciation for the effectiveness of customized fitness programs.
 
I had always wanted to be in the health and fitness industry so I entered Ventura College with the intent of becoming a physical therapist.  I needed to work like most of us, so I began selling fitness equipment.  This sales position grew into a phone fitness counseling position.  It was during these counseling sessions that I realized what fitness could do for people both from a mental and physical standpoint.  My appreciation for specific instructed fitness programs began to mature.  I immersed myself in the fitness world taking a job working for a small club in southern California.  This job allowed me to experience club management as well as an early taste of personal training a field that I believed was about to explode.
 
After receiving my Associates Degree from Ventura College I chose to continue my education at California State University Northridge.  This forced me to leave my then club management position and take on a new career as a personal trainer for Spectrum Club Agoura Hills. The Sports Club Company which owned Spectrum Clubs at the time became the catalyst for an awesome future in the fitness industry.  They had committed themselves to continuing education for all of their trainers. They kept us on the cutting edge of current trends and evidence based instruction which ultimately led me to the National Academy of Sports Medicine, which in my opinion is the premier certification organization within our field.

It is 1996 and my personal training business is taking off.  A lot of the trainers that I worked with at the time were in the fitness industry waiting to do something else.  I had come to believe that fitness was the future in preemptive health care and decided to treat my fitness business with the same level of professionalism and dedication that a career of that importance would demand.  

My certifications include NASM's standard and advanced trainer certification a precursor for their CPT and CES certification that I hold today. I became a full time personal trainer in the southern California area and have my own training and consulting business in greater Los Angeles.

I have been personally blessed to see lives forever changed.  I have also been lifted up by having a hand in many of those changes.  I am very thankful to have found this industry and look forward to the many lives that health and fitness will impact in the near and present future.  I am also very excited to witness the technological explosion that is occurring within our industry and the future that we will have working with new friends across the world.  Looking forward to meeting you.


mailto:taylorfitness@me.com


Yours in Fitness,

Troy Taylor CPT, CES 

Activity

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