Rachel Gilmore , NASM Elite Trainer

Bio

For fitness expert Rachel Gilmore, personal wellness is neither a hobby nor a job, but a true passion, one that extends from her own weight loss journey and continues with every client who she works with. She wasn’t always a fitness expert, of course, but her own experiences changed all that. Struggling to shed pounds and shave inches after the birth of her third child, Rachel Gilmore quickly discovered the best practices for getting healthy, including both exercise tips and nutrition guidelines. Witnessing the results of these practices in real life—in her own life and her own body—ignited a passion that continues to this day.

 

That’s good news for anyone looking to get fit and healthy. These days, Rachel Gilmore puts her passion to work for her—and lends her considerable fitness expertise. She is certified not only as an Impact instructor but also as a Sharecare Elite Trainer and Certified Personal Trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine.

 

Gilmore’s own experiences have taught her that getting healthy isn’t something that happens as the result of a snap decision, nor can it be attained through a brief “dieting” period or short-lived commitment to exercise. It takes a lifestyle overhaul, and Gilmore’s passion lies in providing the tools to do just that. She’s eager to work with any client who is truly interested in being healthy, and who wants to take advantage of the built-in accountability and professional support that she can provide.

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Orthopedic Surgery:

    SATURDAY, March 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- One-third of young athletes who have surgery to repair the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee suffer another ACL injury later in life, new research finds.

    "Our study shows that young knees are more prone to re-injury than the adult p...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fit middle-aged men appear less likely to develop lung and colon cancer in later life than their out-of-shape peers. And if they do develop cancer, they are more likely to beat it, a new study suggests.

    Nearly 14,000 men underwent treadmill tes...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Orthopedic Surgery:

    TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Having a second elbow ligament reconstruction surgery appears to lower professional baseball pitchers' performance and shorten their careers, a new study finds.

    Researchers looked at 33 major league pitchers who had surgery twice to reconstruct ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Orthopedics:

    TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- It's the latest thing among avid runners: "minimalist" shoes that approach the way humans first ran -- barefoot.

    But a new study suggests that runners over the age of 30 who transition from traditional running shoes to minimalist shoes should do...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Sports Medicine:

    TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Young baseball players feel pressure from parents or coaches to continue playing despite arm pain, and many parents are unaware of guidelines to reduce injury risk, a pair of recent studies found.

    "Kids are playing harder and longer in more leag...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Fitness:

    MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Neither routine exercise nor vitamin D supplementation does anything to lower the overall risk for accidental falls among older women, a new Finnish study says.

    However, the risk of serious injury as a result of falling was cut by more than half ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Sexual Health:

    MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Up and at 'em, guys. Exercise might boost your sex life, a new study suggests.

    Nearly 300 men provided information about their physical activity levels and their ability to have erections and orgasms, the quality and frequency of erections, and t...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Sports Medicine:

    FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical science has shown that football can take a terrible toll on the human brain, with repeated hits to the head potentially adding up to brain damage later in life.

    But, it's been unclear whether players actively consider and accept the risk ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Mental Health Nursing:

    THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that yoga may help ease depression in pregnant women.

    "This is really about trying to develop a wider range of options that suit women who are experiencing these kind of symptoms during pregnancy," lead author Cynthia Batt...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Age Management Medicine:

    WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A healthy diet, physical activity and brain exercises can help slow mental decline in older people at risk for dementia, a new study suggests.

    On the other hand, a high body-mass index (BMI) and poor heart health are...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neurology:

    WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Staying physically active as you age may ward off brain damage that can limit mobility, a small study says.

    Small areas of brain damage called white matter hyperintensities are seen in MRI scans of many older patients, according to scientists ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a modest amount of nuts appears to lower the risk for teens of developing conditions that raise the chances of heart disease later in life, new research suggests.

    By "modest," investigators mean eating at least three small handfuls of nuts ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Fitness:

    FRIDAY, March 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- If you start an exercise program, it might inspire your spouse to do the same, a new study says.

    "When it comes to physical fitness, the best peer pressure to get moving could be coming from the person who sits across from you at the breakfast tab...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Sports Medicine:

    THURSDAY, March 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise may increase the size of brain regions that contribute to balance and coordination, preliminary research suggests.

    The small new study in twins found that those who exercised more had increased brain volume in areas of the brain relate...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who have trouble coping with stress may face an increased risk for future heart trouble that even exercise can't erase, a new study suggests.

    "It looks like the inability to cope well with stress contributes to the risk of heart disease,"...Full Article