Bio

Patsy Danehy Catsos, M.S., R.D., L.D. is medical nutrition therapist, consultant and writer, with a private practice in Portland, Maine. She enthusiastically empowers her patients and readers to improve wellness with healing foods and nutrition based on cutting edge science. Her trailblazing book, IBS--Free at Last!, now in its second edition, introduced U.S. dietitians, physicians and consumers to an exciting and effective dietary program for relieving the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. She is the editor of www.ibsfree.net, and a sough-after expert on the subject of diet and IBS. Ms. Catsos is active in her professional association, the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and in its Maine affiliate. She is a professional member of the Chrohn's and Colitis Foundation of American and the North American Society for the Study of Celiac Disease.

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • President, Maine Dietetic Association, IBS Expert

Location:

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Endocrinology/diabetes/metabolism:

    MONDAY, Sept. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Metformin, a drug commonly used to treat diabetes, may raise the risk of low levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) among patients with an underactive thyroid, a new study suggests.

    The researchers cautioned that l...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Endocrinology/diabetes/metabolism:

    FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Trulicity (dulaglutide) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat type 2 diabetes, which accounts for 90 percent of diabetes cases in the United States.

    The drug contains a hormone that helps stabilize blood sugar at nor...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Endocrinology/diabetes/metabolism:

    FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A six-year study of people with type 2 diabetes found that intensively lowering blood pressure had a long-lasting effect in preventing heart attacks, strokes and deaths. But intensive blood sugar control didn't produce those benefits, the researchers fou

    ...Full Article
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Ophthalmology:

    THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Daily supplements of selenium or vitamin E don't seem to protect against the development of age-related cataracts among men, a new study indicates.

    Previous animal research has suggested that one or both could help prevent cataracts. To invest...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychiatry:

    WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have the largest number of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms are almost three times more likely to develop an addiction to food, a new study suggests.

    The findings don't prove a direct link between PTSD and women overeating or...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Epidemiology:

    WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetics and dieters who turn to artificial sweeteners to soothe their sweet tooth may not be doing themselves any favors, a new Israeli study suggests.

    Artificial sweeteners can potentially make blood sugar levels rise despite containing no ...Full Article

  • Patsy Catsos - Portland, ME - Nutrition & Dietetics
    Patsy Catsos answered:
    Yes. Gas in the digestive tract is created by gut bacteria when they consume leftover sugars and fibers from our food in a process called fermentation. That is actually a normal and healthy process. But the gas produced does distend the intestines (blows them up a little bit, like a balloon) until it is e...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Preventive Medicine:

    WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Sixteen major food and beverage companies have made good on their pledge to cut calories in their U.S. products, a new report finds.

    The companies, acting together through the Healthy Weight Commitment Foundation, pledged to remove 1 trillion ...Full Article

  • Patsy Catsos - Portland, ME - Nutrition & Dietetics
    Patsy Catsos answered:
    I don't believe in a one-size-fits-all approach to diet for IBS. You have to work at it a little bit to find out the best diet for you. First, make sure you have tried basic measures like eating regular meals, eating enough fiber and getting enough fluids. If that doesn't work, or if eating more fiber...Read More
  • Patsy Catsos - Portland, ME - Nutrition & Dietetics
    Patsy Catsos answered:
    While its a good idea to try a high fiber diet, many people with IBS find it doesn't help, or may even make symptoms worse. In that case, a FODMAP elimination diet might help you figure out what kind of, and how much, fiber you can tolerate. FODMAPs are certain sugars and certain fibers in the diet that...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Public Health:

    FRIDAY, Sept. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Older people exposed to high levels of black carbon -- the fine particle air pollution from traffic -- may have increased levels of leptin, a hormone linked to obesity, diabetes and heart disease, a new study suggests.

    Although the research doesn...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Nutrition & Dietetics:

    FRIDAY, Sept. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Eating more fish may reduce a woman's risk for hearing loss, according to a large new study.

    Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston found that consuming at least two servings of fish and omega-3s (long-c...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Public Health:

    THURSDAY, Sept. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new weight-loss medication for the overweight and obese has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Adminstration.

    Contrave is a combination of two already-approved drugs, naltrexone and bupropion, in extended-release form. The former is appr...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Epidemiology:

    THURSDAY, Sept. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Discrimination against overweight or obese people, commonly known as "fat shaming," does not help them lose weight and may do more harm than good, according to research from London.

    Being harassed or treated with disrespect, receiving poor se...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychiatry:

    THURSDAY, Sept. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Obese people may be more vulnerable to environmental food cues than thin people because of differences in their brain chemistry, a new study suggests.

    This finding could explain why obese people tend to overeat in response to food triggers, suc...Full Article