Bio

Heidi Skolnik, MS, CDN, FACSM, has influenced millions of people on nutrition and health for more than 25 years through mass media and one-on-one interactions. Heidi is the sports nutrition consultant to
       The New York Knicks,
       The Juilliard School  
       The School of American Ballet and
       Fordham University
among other institutions and was with the New York Giants Football Team for 18 years. She maintains one-to-one practice one day a week at The Women’s Sports Medicine Center at Hospital for Special Surgery, the first of its kind in the country.  Heidi also has expertise within the corporate wellness arena, working with top companies such as Morgan Stanley, Becton-Dickinson, Johnson and Johnson, Colgate-Palmolive and Merrill-Lynch.  Heidi began her career in the wellness arena before becoming more established in the nutrition world leading individuals, sports teams and corporations in strategic approaches to making smarter food choices. Heidi incorporates behavioral aspects of change and delivers the most current and proven concepts to help meet overall wellness goals. A well-known and respected leader in the nutrition and fitness world, an author, speaker and consultant to industry as well as the public, Heidi's advice is sound and tailored to give clients the practical tools needed to promote optimal health and improve performance levels – in everyday life or athletic competition.  Heidi sits on the board of the National Osteoporosis Foundation. A realist, Heidi believes M&Ms can fit into a healthy diet along with red peppers, red meat, broccoli and fresh fruit, and that healthy eating and exercise change and evolve to meet our personal needs and goals. She is the president of Nutrition Conditioning, a nutrition and wellness consultancy firm.

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Mental Health:

    TUESDAY, March 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Guidelines for helping U.S. high school athletes with mental health problems are outlined in a new policy statement from the National Athletic Trainers' Association.

    The types, severity and percentages of mental illnesses are growing in young adu...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Emergency Medicine:

    MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the days and weeks following a concussion, it's often tough to give patients a clear sense of their recovery time.

    Now, a new study of college football players suggests that measuring blood flow in the brain might hel...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Sports Medicine:

    WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Football helmet add-ons may not reduce players' risk of concussion, a new study suggests.

    These safety products include items such as soft-shell layers, spray treatments, pads and fiber sheets.

    "Our study suggests that despite many prod...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Fitness:

    WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- With increasing evidence that sitting for long periods isn't good for your waistline or your health in general, efforts have begun to focus on ways to shake up the traditional American workplace.

    One such innovation that's been touted as a poss...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Physical Medicine/rehabilitation:

    TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Achilles tendon can handle downhill running better than previously thought, says a study that offers good news for distance runners.

    The key is to transition gradually to downhill running, the Brigham Young University researchers noted.

    ...Full Article
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    MONDAY, Feb. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Even a few bouts of moderate exercise each week can cut a middle-aged woman's odds for heart disease, blood clots and stroke, a new study finds.

    The British study also found that exercising more frequently didn't lead to greater reductions in hear...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Physiology:

    WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Muscles that control breathing require more oxygen in women than in men, a new study has found.

    The findings could prove important in the treatment of lung disorders, the Canadian researchers said.

    They tested men and women during exerci...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Fitness:

    MONDAY, Feb. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A little jogging is good for your health, researchers say, but too much might not be.

    "In this study, the dose of running that was most favorable for reducing mortality was jogging 1 to 2.4 hours per week, with no more than three running days per w...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Sports Medicine:

    THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Another study supports the notion that repeated blows to the head in boxing or the martial arts can damage the brain.

    The study, led by Dr. Charles Bernick of the Cleveland Clinic, included professional fighters -- 93 boxers and 131 mixed marti...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Athletic Training:

    THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Who's going to win Sunday's Super Bowl? It may depend, in part, on which team has the most "night owls," a new study suggests.

    The study found that athletes' performance throughout a given day can range widely depending on whether they're natura...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neurology:

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As football fans prepare to watch the 49th Super Bowl this Sunday, a new study suggests that boys who start playing tackle football before the age of 12 may face a higher risk for neurological deficits as adults.

    The concern stems from an asses...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Family Medicine:

    THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new eye-tracking method might help determine the severity of concussions, researchers report.

    They said the simple approach can be used in emergency departments and, perhaps one day, on the sidelines at sporting events.

    "Concussion is ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Geriatrics:

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 1 in 5 Americans 80 and older has weak strength in their muscles, according to new research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    That number declines in younger age brackets, with just 2 percent of Americans ages 60 ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neurology:

    TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Concussions may damage areas of the brain related to memory in National Football League players. And that damage might linger long after the players leave the sport, according to a small study.

    "We're hoping that our findings are going to further...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychiatry:

    FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Young women who regularly exercise may have more oxygen circulating in their brains -- and possibly sharper minds, a small study suggests.

    The findings, from a study of 52 healthy young women, don't prove that exercise makes you smarter, researche...Full Article