Bio

Heidi Skolnik, MS, CDN, FACSM, has influenced millions of people on nutrition and health for more than 25 years through mass media and one-on-one interactions. Heidi is the sports nutrition consultant to
       The New York Knicks,
       The Juilliard School  
       The School of American Ballet and
       Fordham University
among other institutions and was with the New York Giants Football Team for 18 years. She maintains one-to-one practice one day a week at The Women’s Sports Medicine Center at Hospital for Special Surgery, the first of its kind in the country.  Heidi also has expertise within the corporate wellness arena, working with top companies such as Morgan Stanley, Becton-Dickinson, Johnson and Johnson, Colgate-Palmolive and Merrill-Lynch.  Heidi began her career in the wellness arena before becoming more established in the nutrition world leading individuals, sports teams and corporations in strategic approaches to making smarter food choices. Heidi incorporates behavioral aspects of change and delivers the most current and proven concepts to help meet overall wellness goals. A well-known and respected leader in the nutrition and fitness world, an author, speaker and consultant to industry as well as the public, Heidi's advice is sound and tailored to give clients the practical tools needed to promote optimal health and improve performance levels – in everyday life or athletic competition.  Heidi sits on the board of the National Osteoporosis Foundation. A realist, Heidi believes M&Ms can fit into a healthy diet along with red peppers, red meat, broccoli and fresh fruit, and that healthy eating and exercise change and evolve to meet our personal needs and goals. She is the president of Nutrition Conditioning, a nutrition and wellness consultancy firm.

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Sports Medicine:

    FRIDAY, Sept. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- It's a debilitating injury, but an ACL tear typically doesn't mean the end of a college athlete's career, a new study finds.

    The research suggests that the risk for a reinjury of the knee's anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) actually goes down as ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Public Health:

    FRIDAY, Sept. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Although there is mounting evidence that muscle-strength training provides key health benefits, most middle-aged and older adults in the United States don't engage in this type of exercise, according to new research.

    Less than one-quarter of adul...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    MONDAY, Sept. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. heart experts recommend doctors use a 14-point checklist rather than an electrocardiogram (ECG) when evaluating young people for underlying heart disease that could result in sudden cardiac arrest.

    The American Heart Association and the Amer...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    THURSDAY, Sept. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Children might do better in school if they're more physically active, a new study suggests.

    Researchers assessed the activity levels and reading and math skills of 186 Finnish children in grades 1 to 3.

    The st...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Sports Medicine:

    FRIDAY, Sept. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The recent deaths of two high school football players highlight the danger faced by athletes if they drink too much water or too many sports drinks, a new study says.

    The players died of exercise-associated hyponatremia, which occurs when athletes...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Sports Medicine:

    FRIDAY, Sept. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The recent deaths of two high school football players highlight the danger faced by athletes if they drink too much water or too many sports drinks, a new study says.

    The players died of exercise-associated hyponatremia, which occurs when athletes...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Sports Medicine:

    WEDNESDAY, Sept. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Spending less time sitting might increase your lifespan by keeping your DNA young, Swedish researchers say.

    More time spent on your feet appears to lengthen bits of DNA called telomeres. Telomeres, which protect the e...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Preventive Medicine:

    TUESDAY, Sept. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Big dieting names like Atkins, Ornish and Weight Watchers have long competed in the battle of the bulge. But a new analysis concludes that whichever diet people choose, their chances of success are about the same.

    For years, people seeking to she...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    WEDNESDAY, Aug. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise may help older women avoid a condition that causes a life-threatening irregular heartbeat, a new study shows.

    Physically active postmenopausal women had a 10 percent lower risk of developing atrial fibrillation, compared to wom...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Fitness:

    TUESDAY, Aug. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- College-educated Americans tend to be more physically active on weekends, while adults without a high school diploma are more active on weekdays, a new study finds.

    Researchers analyzed data from the 2005-2006 U.S. National Health and Nutrition E...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Public Health:

    FRIDAY, Aug. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Brisk walking and other forms of exercise reduce a black woman's risk of breast cancer, U.S. researchers report.

    They followed more than 44,000 black women for 16 years. They found those who exercised vigorously for seven or more hours a week were...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Fitness:

    FRIDAY, Aug. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Summertime fun often includes outdoor sports, but playing hard in the heat can be dangerous, experts warn.

    Athletes are particularly vulnerable to problems that arise when the body's ability to cool itself is overwhelmed, explained Tim McLane, cert...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Sports Medicine:

    TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- High school lacrosse players are facing an increasing number of injuries during practices as well as games, a new study finds.

    Although the most common injuries are sprains and strains, more than 22 percent are concussions, researchers report. Th...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Orthopedic Surgery:

    THURSDAY, July 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Most professional football players who have shoulder stabilization surgery are able to return to the game, a new study finds.

    Shoulder instability is a common injury among NFL players, but their rate of return after surgery to fix the problem ha...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neurology:

    WEDNESDAY, July 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Safeguarding athletes from concussion is a moral duty for doctors, according to the largest neurologists' group in the United States.

    In a newly released position statement, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) said that doctors have an ethic...Full Article