Dr. Randy P. Martin, MD

Bio

Host of HealthWatchMD, Atlanta Health News

Served on Faculties of Stanford Medical School, University of Virginia Medical School, Mayo Medical School & Clinic, Rochester, MN, & Emory University School of Medicine, as Professor & Associate Dean. 160 peer-reviewed journal publications. Past President, American Society of Echo. Medical Correspondent, Cox Television, WSB-TV, Atlanta, GA, 15 years. Joined Piedmont Heart Institute, 2009.

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • Medical Director, Cardiovascular Imaging, Piedmont Hospital Chief Structural & Valvular Heart Disease, Piedmont Heart InstituteEchocardiographyPiedmont Heart Institute

Location:

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Extremely obese children -- such as those at least 100 pounds overweight -- are in deeper trouble in terms of heart disease risks than doctors have thought, new research suggests.

    In the study, about half the children suffered from high blood pres...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiothoracic Surgery:

    MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The high number of blood tests done before and after heart surgery can sometimes lead to excessive blood loss, possibly causing anemia and the need for a blood transfusion, new research suggests.

    The study included almos...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Thoracic Surgery:

    MONDAY, March 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People with a serious heart valve defect have less depression and anxiety after they undergo surgery to repair the problem, a new study finds.

    The research included people with severe mitral regurgitation, which occurs w...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Treating half of people with uncontrolled high blood pressure could prevent 10 million heart attacks and strokes worldwide over 10 years, according to experts.

    Most people with uncontrolled high blood pressure (or "hypertension") are in low- and m...Full Article

  • Randy P. Martin, MD - Atlanta, GA - Cardiology
    Your skin covers 16 square feet and weighs about 10 lbs, so take care of it by eating foods that are rich in antioxidants, omega 3 fats, vitamin A and vitamin C. Watch this video to learn more tips from Dr. Randy P. Martin about foods that are very good for your skin.

      Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Vascular Medicine:

    THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Your odds of suffering from high blood pressure may rise depending on the state you live in, a new study suggests.

    Researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that people living in low-income states are more likely ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Heart failure patients who struggle to perform daily tasks are at increased risk for hospitalization and death, a new study shows.

    The study included more than 1,100 people with heart failure, average age 75, who were classified as having eithe...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Younger women may ignore early warning signs of a heart attack, a new study reveals.

    The finding could help explain why younger women have higher rates of death from heart attack than men in their age group.

    "Young women with multiple ris...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Common painkillers such as ibuprofen and Celebrex may raise the risk for heart attack, stroke and/or serious bleeding among heart attack survivors taking prescription blood thinners, a new study says.

    The finding could prompt widespread concern, ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Intense anger or anxiety greatly increases the risk of heart attack, a new study warns.

    "While the absolute risk of any one anger episode triggering a heart attack is low, our data demonstrates that the danger is real and still there," said Dr. T...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Homeless people with mental illness are at high risk for heart disease, a new study suggests.

    Canadian researchers found that they have a 24.5 percent risk of heart attack, fatal or nonfatal stroke, or sudden cardiac death over 30 years.

    ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neurology:

    MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People who are "resistant" to aspirin may be at risk for larger, more severe strokes, South Korean researchers report.

    Doctors often prescribe low-dose aspirin to people at high risk of stroke because the drug helps prevent blood clots. But for ab...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sweating it out in a hot sauna may be relaxing, and new research suggests it may also be good for your heart health.

    A study from Finland found that men who use saunas frequently are less likely to die from heart disease. Men's risk was even lowe...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Light physical activity may benefit older adults' hearts -- even if they have mobility issues, a new study suggests.

    It's well known that regular exercise can do a heart good, at any age. But there's little evidence on whether light activity ca...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    TUESDAY, Feb. 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The various "calculators" that doctors use to estimate patients' odds of future heart trouble often overestimate the risks, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that four of five widely used formulas may overestimate people's risk of heart att...Full Article