Dr. Michael Roizen, MD

Bio

Michael F. Roizen, MD, a Sharecare Editorial Advisory member, is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Williams College, Alpha Omega Alpha graduate of the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, and is board certified in both Anesthesiology and Internal Medicine. In 2007 Dr. Roizen was named the Chief Wellness Officer (the first such position in a major healthcare institution in the United States) for Cleveland Clinic, and Chair of its Wellness Institute. Dr. Roizen co-founded RealAge and chairs its Scientific Advisory Board. He is 68 calendar years of age, but his RealAge is 47.9. He and Dr Oz have authored 8 NY Times bestsellers between them, and three separately, including 4 #1 NY Times Bestsellers, including RealAge, Are You As Young As You Can Be, YOU: The Owner’s Manual, YOU: On A Diet, the Owner’s Manual for Waist Management, and YOU Staying Young, the Owner’s Manual for Extending Your Warranty.

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • Cleveland Clinic

Location:

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Treating half of people with uncontrolled high blood pressure could prevent 10 million heart attacks and strokes worldwide over 10 years, according to experts.

    Most people with uncontrolled high blood pressure (or "hypertension") are in low- and m...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Infectious Disease:

    FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two cases of hepatitis C infection that occurred during routine surgeries highlight the need for hospitals to tighten infection control to prevent more transmissions, officials said Friday.

    In one case, two New Jersey patients (one of them had he...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatric Gastroenterology:

    FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some babies spit up more than others, but it doesn't necessarily mean they have a problem, an expert says.

    A baby's stomach is small and can tolerate only small amounts of food. As a baby grows, so does his or her stomach and spitting up becomes l...Full Article

  • Michael Roizen, MD - Cleveland, OH - Internal Medicine
    Michael Roizen, MD answered:
    When you’re addicted to something, you begin to crave it because a key neurotransmitter, such as dopamine, has signaled your brain to feel pleasure. You want more, and you develop a habit to get more. You keep up that process of needing more until it becomes an addiction. You repeat the behavior to get...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neurology:

    THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More than nine in 10 epilepsy patients who had brain surgery to try to control their seizures are happy they did so, a new survey reveals.

    The review appears to be driven by the fact that patients saw the number of debilitating seizures they exp...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Orthopedics:

    WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Older patients with a broken hip are more likely to die after the fracture if they're discharged from the hospital early, a new study indicates.

    "Our results suggest that the continuous efforts to decrease length of stay after major surgery is ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neurology:

    WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who sleep more than eight hours a night may face a higher risk of stroke, a new analysis suggests.

    These so-called "long sleepers" were 46 percent more likely to have a stroke than those who got only six to eight hours of sleep a night, ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Heart failure patients who struggle to perform daily tasks are at increased risk for hospitalization and death, a new study shows.

    The study included more than 1,100 people with heart failure, average age 75, who were classified as having eithe...Full Article

  • Michael Roizen, MD - Cleveland, OH - Internal Medicine
    Michael Roizen, MD answered:
    Experts don't quite know why walking 10,000 steps a day (about 5 miles) works, but they do know that 10,000 seems to be the minimum number that provides the most health benefit. In fact, "10K a day" breaks down insulin resistance much better than 8K, and 12K doesn’t help more than 10K does. So 10K a day...Read More
    1
    1. Robert Harris Great info!
      3 Days Ago
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. recommendations against the PSA test for prostate cancer might have prompted a small but measurable increase in the number of higher-risk cases diagnosed recently, according to a new study.

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) in...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Common painkillers such as ibuprofen and Celebrex may raise the risk for heart attack, stroke and/or serious bleeding among heart attack survivors taking prescription blood thinners, a new study says.

    The finding could prompt widespread concern, ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Addiction Medicine:

    TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two-thirds of smokers will die early from their habit if they don't quit, a new study suggests.

    The findings indicate that it's never too late to quit smoking, one expert said.

    Researchers analyzed data from more than 200,000 people takin...Full Article

  • Michael Roizen, MD - Cleveland, OH - Internal Medicine
    Michael Roizen, MD answered:
    These days, there are numerous ways to count steps (or mileage or calories), and that’s through higher-tech gadgets and do-it-yourself smartphone apps that attempt to make life even easier for the user. You do the work; it records the data. In fact, research shows that self-monitoring is an effective form...Read More
    1
    1. Robert Harris Very true! I definitely notice that myself.
      4 Days Ago
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Choosing active surveillance over treatment for prostate cancer may decrease the odds of survival in men with intermediate-risk cancer, a new study says.

    The risk of death over 15 years for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancers who chose clo...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sweating it out in a hot sauna may be relaxing, and new research suggests it may also be good for your heart health.

    A study from Finland found that men who use saunas frequently are less likely to die from heart disease. Men's risk was even lowe...Full Article