Dr. Michael Roizen, MD

Bio

Michael F. Roizen, MD, a Sharecare Editorial Advisory member, is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Williams College, Alpha Omega Alpha graduate of the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, and is board certified in both Anesthesiology and Internal Medicine. In 2007 Dr. Roizen was named the Chief Wellness Officer (the first such position in a major healthcare institution in the United States) for Cleveland Clinic, and Chair of its Wellness Institute. Dr. Roizen co-founded RealAge and chairs its Scientific Advisory Board. He is 64 calendar years of age, but his RealAge is 44.3. He and Dr Oz have authored 8 NY Times bestsellers between them, and three separately, including 4 #1 NY Times Bestsellers, including RealAge, Are You As Young As You Can Be, YOU: The Owner’s Manual, YOU: On A Diet, the Owner’s Manual for Waist Management, and YOU Staying Young, the Owner’s Manual for Extending Your Warranty.

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • Cleveland Clinic

Location:

Activity

  • Michael Roizen, MD
    Michael Roizen, MD answered:
    Headaches can come in lots of forms, and knowing which kind you have will help you stop it and prevent it from happening again. The first thing to do is make sure you don't have a secondary headache. That is, a headache that's not the problem itself, but rather a side effect of some other health problem,...Read More
  • Michael Roizen, MD
    Michael Roizen, MD answered:
    From a broad perspective, the penis is a man's dipstick; it tells you how everything is functioning throughout the rest of your body.

    If the solider stands at attention when called to do so, it indicates that you have good blood flow in other places. But if he decides to take a little R&R, it means...Read More
  • Michael Roizen, MD
    Michael Roizen, MD answered:
    Pheromones - odorless (to your conscious smeller) steroids that can be detected at picogram concentration (that's one trillionth of a gram, sort of like a single molecule dancing along) - float through the air, stimulate nerves in your nose. The nerve signals are carried to your brain, and trigger complicated chemical...Read More
  • Michael Roizen, MD
    Michael Roizen, MD answered:
    Many people are deficient in folate, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12.

    As for folate, you tend to take in less from food as you age, and the concentration of folate in your body drops. In fact, a lack of folate is the most common vitamin deficiency among older people. Foods such as asparagus, artichokes,...Read More
  • Michael Roizen, MD
    Michael Roizen, MD answered:
    Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a fairly difficult disease to contract, exposure to other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) reduces the immune system's defenses and increases the likelihood that HIV will actually infect a person who has been exposed. Estimates are that a person...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    MONDAY, April 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Teens whose brain chemistry is less affected by stressful situations could be at increased risk for car crashes, a small Canadian study suggests.

    Safe-driving teens appear to have higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol, said study author Mar...Full Article

  • Michael Roizen, MD
    Michael Roizen, MD answered:
    Walking, swimming, and biking aren't just good for your heart health, your waist line, and your sexual magnetism. Regular aerobic exercise also means that you'll be having less regular headaches. How? It helps relieve stress and increases the levels of pain-killing endorphins. Similarly, yoga, st...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Hepatology:

    THURSDAY, April 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking coffee may reduce the risk of death from certain types of liver cirrhosis, a large new study suggests.

    The study included more than 63,000 Chinese people, aged 45 to 74, living in Singapore. Starting in 1993, they provided information ...Full Article

  • Michael Roizen, MD
    Michael Roizen, MD answered:
    Limit your saturated and trans fats (an artificial form of saturated fat) to less than 20 grams a day. No food element has been more closely linked to arterial aging than these kinds of fats, found mostly in meats, full-fat dairy products, baked goods, fried fast foods, and palm and coconut oils....Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    THURSDAY, April 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A simple urine test for people with high blood pressure could help doctors determine if patients aren't taking their medication as directed or whether their body isn't respond to treatment, a new study suggests.

    Using this test, British research...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    THURSDAY, April 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For people with high blood sugar at risk of type 2 diabetes, losing weight and exercising may lessen their chances of dying from heart disease or other conditions, a new long-term study suggests.

    People enrolled in the study on diabetes preventi...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    WEDNESDAY, April 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- College freshmen football players show signs of having stiffer blood vessels than their leaner peers who don't play football, according to new research.

    Exactly what that means for players' later heart health isn't yet clear.

    "The foo...Full Article

  • Michael Roizen, MD
    Michael Roizen, MD answered:
    Of course, depression is associated with any age, but it can quickly make you feel, act, and look older-and have a seriously negative impact on aging.

    For one, depression is tied to cardiovascular aging. In one study, men and women who had heart disease and depression had a 69 percent higher rate...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    MONDAY, March 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Recent research has raised the possibility that low-dose aspirin could add extra years to the lives of colon cancer patients. Now, a new study suggests that only certain patients may gain a survival benefit by taking aspirin after diagnosis.

    Th...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Infectious Disease:

    MONDAY, March 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Providing drug therapy to HIV-positive prison inmates helped a significant number of them achieve suppression of the virus before they were released, a new study finds.

    HIV patients with so-called "viral suppression" are less likely to transmit t...Full Article