Dr. Michael Roizen, MD

Bio

Michael F. Roizen, MD, a Sharecare Editorial Advisory member, is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Williams College, Alpha Omega Alpha graduate of the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, and is board certified in both Anesthesiology and Internal Medicine. In 2007 Dr. Roizen was named the Chief Wellness Officer (the first such position in a major healthcare institution in the United States) for Cleveland Clinic, and Chair of its Wellness Institute. Dr. Roizen co-founded RealAge and chairs its Scientific Advisory Board. He is 68 calendar years of age, but his RealAge is 47.9. He and Dr Oz have authored 8 NY Times bestsellers between them, and three separately, including 4 #1 NY Times Bestsellers, including RealAge, Are You As Young As You Can Be, YOU: The Owner’s Manual, YOU: On A Diet, the Owner’s Manual for Waist Management, and YOU Staying Young, the Owner’s Manual for Extending Your Warranty.

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • Cleveland Clinic

Activity

  • Michael Roizen, MD - Cleveland, OH - Internal Medicine
    Michael Roizen, MD answered:
    More than 6 million women in North America have trouble conceiving or maintaining a pregnancy. About 5 million U.S. men will also seek medical help for fertility issues sometime in their lives.

    Fertility treatments are a blessing for many (4 million babies are born as a result of fertility-enhancing p...Read More
  • Michael Roizen, MD - Cleveland, OH - Internal Medicine
    Michael Roizen, MD posted a photo:
    Get a Health Buddy and Get Healthy! http://bit.ly/1F7oqNb
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Public Health:

    WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A potentially life-threatening slowing of the heart can occur when the common heart drug amiodarone is taken with new hepatitis C medications, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

    The dangerous slowing of the heart -- called symptomati...Full Article

  • Michael Roizen, MD - Cleveland, OH - Internal Medicine
    Michael Roizen, MD answered:
    I believe that adding growth hormones to beef and milk nudges a consumer's cancer risk upward. Growth hormones have been banned in Europe since 1989, but in the U.S., about 60% of cattle get them. These days, you can buy dairy products from cows that received no growth hormones. When it comes to meat, look for cuts labeled...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychiatry:

    WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to common air pollutants before birth may make children more likely to have the symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and other thinking and behavioral problems, a small new study suggests.

    "Exposure to air poll...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Epidemiology:

    WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution may take a toll not only on physical health, but mental well-being as well, two new studies suggest.

    In one, researchers confirmed a long-studied connection between air pollution and cardiovascular health -- finding evidence that...Full Article

  • Michael Roizen, MD - Cleveland, OH - Internal Medicine
    Michael Roizen, MD answered:
    Vitamin D3 protects against infections, and it seems to be one of the nutrients lacking in breast milk. You can make sure that your baby gets adequate amounts by giving her a liquid baby multivitamin containing 400 IU of vitamin D, like Poly-Vi-Sol, up to age two, and then change to a chewable multivitamin...Read More
  • Michael Roizen, MD - Cleveland, OH - Internal Medicine
    Michael Roizen, MD has posted a blog entry:
    By Michael Roizen, MD, and Mehmet Oz, MD


    Guys, want to keep your sperm healthy and increase your chances of conception if you’re trying to have a...Full Post
  • Michael Roizen, MD - Cleveland, OH - Internal Medicine
    Michael Roizen, MD has posted a blog entry:
    By Michael Roizen, MD, and Mehmet Oz, MD


    Want to live longer? Try adding more veggies -- especially fiber-rich beans -- to your diet. Doing this...Full Post
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose parents smoke may be at greater risk of developing heart disease when they're adults than children of nonsmoking parents, a new study says.

    The study included people in Finland whose exposure as children to parents' smoke was measu...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Fitness:

    MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Neither routine exercise nor vitamin D supplementation does anything to lower the overall risk for accidental falls among older women, a new Finnish study says.

    However, the risk of serious injury as a result of falling was cut by more than half ...Full Article

  • Michael Roizen, MD - Cleveland, OH - Internal Medicine
    Michael Roizen, MD has posted a blog entry:
    By Michael Roizen, MD, and Mehmet Oz, MD


    If you think you can’t can turn your life around and become heart healthier because, “It’s just too late,”...Full Post
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D supplements may slow or prevent low-grade prostate cancer from progressing, a small new study suggests.

    "Vitamin D decreases inflammation in tissues, and inflammation is a driver of cancer," explained Bruce Hollis, the study's lead rese...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In Mexican-Americans, heart-damaging risk factors such as high blood pressure or high blood sugar levels are common, even in the absence of obesity, a new study finds.

    Those who weren't obese but were metabolically unhealthy showed similar signs ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Public Health:

    FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of blood fats such as cholesterol and triglycerides can hold vitamin E in the blood and prevent it from reaching the tissues that require it, a small study says.

    The findings suggest that checking only blood levels of vitamin E may no...Full Article