Michael Breus, PhD

Bio

Michael J. Breus, Ph.D., is a Clinical Psychologist and both a Diplomate of the American Board of Sleep Medicine and a Fellow of The American Academy of Sleep Medicine. He was one of the youngest people to have passed the Board at age 31 and, with a specialty in Sleep Disorders, is one of only 163 psychologists in the world with his credentials and distinction. Dr. Breus is dedicated to informing the public and healthcare communities about “disordered sleep” in a sleep-deprived society.

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • Sleep Expert and Clinical Psychologist for Pain Management at Arrowhead Health, Private practitioner at Southwest Spine and Sports

Location:

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Nutrition & Dietetics:

    WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Creamy butter or ice cream versus a crunchy granola bar: A new study suggests that the texture of foods influences people's dieting choices.

    "We studied the link between how a food feels in your mouth and the amount we eat, the types of food ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    MONDAY, April 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Is your spouse biting your head off at the end of a long day? It may be hunger more than anger that's fueling the bad mood, according to a new study that used voodoo dolls and air horns to test spousal aggression.

    For the research, 107 middle-age...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    MONDAY, April 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Fussy and demanding babies are likely to spend slightly more time plopped in front of a TV or computer screen when they're toddlers than are "easier" babies, new research finds.

    It's not clear just what this finding means. Parents could be tryin...Full Article

  • Michael Breus, PhD
    Michael Breus, PhD answered:
    Sleep has a significant impact on children’s weight. Children who are sleep deprived are at greater risk for weight problems. The risk starts early and can extend into adulthood. Recent research into the sleep-weight connection has shown:
    • Babies and toddlers who slept fewer than 12 hours per
    ...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Mental Health:

    THURSDAY, April 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Mental health problems are common among civilians who work for the U.S. military in war zones, a new study finds.

    There are a large number of civilians who provide support services in war zones. For example, the U.S. Army had more than 6,000 c...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    THURSDAY, April 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A doctor's "bedside manner" seems to have a real effect on patients' health, a new research review suggests.

    The review, of 13 clinical trials, found that when doctors were given training to hone their people skills, patients typically fared be...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    THURSDAY, April 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Too much time on Facebook may take a toll on a young woman's sense of self-esteem, particularly how she feels about her body, a new study suggests.

    The study surveyed 881 female college students. They were asked questions about their Facebook u...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    TUESDAY, April 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The widely held belief that only women experience eating disorders delays men with these conditions from getting treatment, a new British study says.

    "Men with eating disorders are underdiagnosed, undertreated and under-researched," write a team ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Mental Health:

    TUESDAY, April 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- One-third of patients admitted to an intensive care unit develop depression that causes physical symptoms rather than the typical psychological signs, a new study finds.

    As a result, their condition may go undiagnosed and they may not get needed ...Full Article

  • Michael Breus, PhD
    Michael Breus, PhD answered:
    Meditation appears to place people in a more relaxed state, both mentally and physically. With a clear mind (from focused meditation) you will have a greater likelihood to falling asleep, and the physical relaxation will allow your body to fall asleep more easily as part of the physical process of...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    FRIDAY, April 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Although sexual harassment is damaging for both men and women in the military, new research finds that military men have more trouble coping with it.

    Men who experience threatening sexual harassment might become more dis...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    FRIDAY, April 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Depression may increase the risk of heart failure, a new study suggests.

    Researchers looked at nearly 63,000 people in Norway who underwent physical and mental health assessments.

    Over 11 years, close to 1,500 of the participants developed...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    FRIDAY, April 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Jobs that make good use of your intellect might have another benefit down the line -- a sharper mind long after retirement.

    People with jobs that require problem solving, planning and information analysis appear more likely to retain a clear memor...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Addiction Medicine:

    FRIDAY, April 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Scenes of cigarette use have become less common on prime-time television shows, and it may be linked to reduced smoking rates in the United States, a new study suggests.

    Researchers from the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Penn...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Public Health:

    WEDNESDAY, April 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Hands-free cellphone use while driving is not risk-free driving, new research shows.

    Eighty percent of U.S. drivers think hands-free smartphones are safer than hand-held ones when they are behind the wheel, the National Safety Council found. Bu...Full Article