Michael Breus, PhD

Bio

Michael J. Breus, Ph.D., is a Clinical Psychologist and both a Diplomate of the American Board of Sleep Medicine and a Fellow of The American Academy of Sleep Medicine. He was one of the youngest people to have passed the Board at age 31 and, with a specialty in Sleep Disorders, is one of only 163 psychologists in the world with his credentials and distinction. Dr. Breus is dedicated to informing the public and healthcare communities about “disordered sleep” in a sleep-deprived society.

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • Sleep Expert and Clinical Psychologist for Pain Management at Arrowhead Health, Private practitioner at Southwest Spine and Sports

Location:

  • city, AZ

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychiatry:

    THURSDAY, Oct. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Reliving the death of a loved one may help people with prolonged grief disorder, a new study suggests.

    Exposure therapy, as this approach is called, appears to help survivors struggling with prolonged grief better than another type of therapy al...Full Article

  • Michael Breus, PhD - city, AZ - Psychology
    Michael Breus, PhD answered:
    Caffeine is a central nervous system stimulant that has the effect of increasing alertness and decreasing drowsiness. It is most often consumed by humans as an infusion that is extracted from either the tealeaf or the coffee bean. Caffeine is considered to be the world’s most widely used psychoactive substance...Read More
  • Michael Breus, PhD - city, AZ - Psychology
    Michael Breus, PhD answered:
    It would be very hard to prove that a full night’s sleep can protect you from infection, since there are so many types of infection. The circumstances of exposure to an infection c would be different for a long or short journey, and the proximity of the source (how close a sick person may sit to...Read More
  • Michael Breus, PhD - city, AZ - Psychology
    Michael Breus, PhD answered:
    Sleep breaks down into 2 categories: Non-REM sleep (Stages 1, 2, 3, & 4) and REM sleep.  Read More
  • Michael Breus, PhD - city, AZ - Psychology
    Michael Breus, PhD has posted a blog entry:
    Scientists studying relationships between different types of cells have encountered some new and potentially important information about how—and wh...Full Post
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychiatry:

    FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The way you walk can affect your mood, according to a new study.

    Previous research has shown that depressed people move differently from happy people, according to study co-author Nikolaus Troje, a senior fellow at the Canadian Institute for Advan...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatric Psychiatry:

    FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Family rejection could be potentially deadly for teens already at risk for suicide, a new study has found.

    When teens were followed six months after discharge from a psychiatric unit for attempting suicide, the majority of boys and girls reported ...Full Article

  • Michael Breus, PhD - city, AZ - Psychology
    Michael Breus, PhD answered:
    No, but it can certainly contribute to it. Lack of sleep will slow down your metabolism which can lead to weight gain. It will also increase levels of Cortisol, which will increase your appetite and will decrease a hormone called Leptin, while increasing a hormone called Ghrelin. Leptin is the “stop” hormone that tells your body to stop...Read More
  • Michael Breus, PhD - city, AZ - Psychology
    Michael Breus, PhD answered:
    No one really knows the answer to this question but there are several schools of thought. The most popular is that a dream represents the organization of thoughts, stimuli, and feelings that are collected throughout a day into a particular structure to be later accessed or recalled. In some research...Read More
  • Michael Breus, PhD - city, AZ - Psychology
    Michael Breus, PhD answered:
    Yes. By taking a brief fifteen to thirty minute nap you reduce the body’s sleep pressure or drive. It is similar to hunger: if you eat a small amount you will become less hungry, and if you sleep for a short period of time, you will become less sleepy. However, you should be careful and try not to...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    TUESDAY, Oct. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Misery loves company, and apparently social media users are no exception.

    When people are feeling low, they're likely to try to make themselves feel better by searching social networking sites for people who are doing even worse, Ohio State Unive...Full Article

  • Michael Breus, PhD - city, AZ - Psychology
    Michael Breus, PhD answered:
    It depends upon the cause of the snoring and your type of nose. There are several physical places inside the nasal cavity and throat where snoring can occur (it is often a combination of areas).  If the snoring is purely nasal in nature, and the individual has a narrow nose, then a nasal strip can be effective....Read More
  • Michael Breus, PhD - city, AZ - Psychology
    Michael Breus, PhD answered:
    If you can, do both on a regular basis.
    The data shows that people who exercise regularly are often good quality sleepers. However it is not known if the exercise is what makes their sleep so good.
    When to exercise depends on the type of exerciser you are. 
    There are typically two types of people,...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Mental Health:

    MONDAY, Oct. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- One out of three people diagnosed with cancer also wind up struggling with a mental health disorder such as anxiety or depression, a new study from Germany reports.

    Many people seem to cope with the natural stress of a cancer diagnosis, but for abo...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    MONDAY, Oct. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Genetics may account for as much as 60 percent of academic achievement, according to a new British study.

    "Genes are important not just in educational achievement or intelligence but in a whole raft of other traits which contribute to how easy and ...Full Article