Michael Breus, PhD

Bio

Michael J. Breus, Ph.D., is a Clinical Psychologist and both a Diplomate of the American Board of Sleep Medicine and a Fellow of The American Academy of Sleep Medicine. He was one of the youngest people to have passed the Board at age 31 and, with a specialty in Sleep Disorders, is one of only 163 psychologists in the world with his credentials and distinction. Dr. Breus is dedicated to informing the public and healthcare communities about “disordered sleep” in a sleep-deprived society.

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • Sleep Expert and Clinical Psychologist for Pain Management at Arrowhead Health, Private practitioner at Southwest Spine and Sports

Location:

  • city, AZ

Activity

  • Michael Breus, PhD - city, AZ - Psychology
    Michael Breus, PhD answered:
    Most lucid dreaming starts with the ability to recall dreams regularly. Thus the first place to start is to begin to try and recall your dreams. This can be done with a dream journal or diary, where you would keep a journal near your bedside table, and when you wake up in the morning, before you...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neurology:

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study -- this one involving patients with Parkinson's disease -- adds another layer of insight to the well-known "placebo effect." That's the phenomenon in which people's symptoms improve after taking an inactive substance simply because they bel

    ...Full Article
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Mental Health:

    THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Binge-watching television is linked with feeling lonely and depressed, a new study suggests.

    "Even though some people argue that binge-watching is a harmless addiction, findings from our study suggest that binge-watching should no longer be view...Full Article

  • Michael Breus, PhD - city, AZ - Psychology
    Michael Breus, PhD answered:
    The answer really depends on the individual, but there are some basic guidelines. While the sleep community says that between 7-9 hours of sleep is best, the data shows that there are many people who sleep well and wake refreshed after only about 6.5 hours or 7 hours. There is also data that shows that...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Geriatrics:

    TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many seniors don't tell their doctors they've had a fall because they're worried they'll be told they can't live on their own anymore, a physician says.

    Millions of Americans aged 65 and older fall every year, according to the U.S. Centers for Di...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Mental Health:

    TUESDAY, Jan. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Student loan debt is a major cause of stress for young adults, a new study finds.

    Researchers looked at survey responses from adults aged 25 to 31 across the United States and found that those with higher student loan debt reported higher levels ...Full Article

  • Michael Breus, PhD - city, AZ - Psychology
    Michael Breus, PhD answered:
    NREM includes all of the stages of sleep other than REM.  The body is able to move and the eyes remain still.  These stages of sleep vary in depth from stage 1 (lightest) to stage 4 (deepest). Stages 3 and 4 are considered deep sleep and this is where most of the physical restoration occurs. Growth...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychiatry:

    FRIDAY, Jan. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Young women who regularly exercise may have more oxygen circulating in their brains -- and possibly sharper minds, a small study suggests.

    The findings, from a study of 52 healthy young women, don't prove that exercise makes you smarter, researche...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Mental Health:

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Age-related blood vessel leaks in the brain may contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia, according to a new study.

    The findings suggest it may be possible to use brain scans to detect such leaks and rep...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- One way of dealing with nasty bosses may be to turn their hostility back on them, a new study suggests.

    Hundreds of U.S. workers were asked if their supervisors were hostile -- doing things such as yelling, ridiculing and intimidating staff -- ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Certain aspects of music have the same effect on people even when they live in very different societies, a new study reveals.

    Researchers asked 40 Mbenzele Pygmies in the Congolese rainforest to listen to short clips of music. They were asked to l...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    THURSDAY, Jan. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Got your heart set on a career as a detective? Here's a clue that may help you crack that first big case.

    A new study suggests that asking eyewitnesses to close their eyes when trying to recall events may boost their memories.

    The study ...Full Article

  • Michael Breus, PhD - city, AZ - Psychology
    Michael Breus, PhD answered:
    Yes. Stages 3 and 4 sleep, also known as delta or deep sleep, are where several hormones which can affect the way we look are produced and distributed throughout the body. For example, growth hormone is distributed in the greatest amounts in deep sleep. This hormone tells our body how to grow, where...Read More
  • Michael Breus, PhD - city, AZ - Psychology
    Michael Breus, PhD answered:
    The trick to using melatonin to help you sleep is to take just the right amount. To find out the standard -- and safe -- dosage of melatonin, watch my video and I will explain. Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Working long hours may raise the risk for alcohol abuse, according to a new study of more than 300,000 people from 14 countries.

    Researchers found that employees who worked more than 48 hours a week were almost 13 percent more likely to drink to ...Full Article