Kathleen Hall

Bio

Dr. Kathleen Hall, internationally recognized lifestyle expert in stress, work-life balance and mindful living, is the founder and CEO of The Stress Institute (www.stressinstitute.com ), and The Mindful Living Network (www.mindfullivingnetwork.com ). During times of stress and crisis: the West Virginia and Utah coal miner tragedies, Katrina ravaging the Gulf Coast, Air France crash in Canada, London terrorist bombing, the Runaway Bride, the national television and print media consistently seek the authoritative knowledge, information and direction of Dr. Kathleen Hall.

Dr. Hall's advice has been featured by all the major national media including NBC's The Today Show,  Dr. OZ Show, Anderson Cooper 360, Paula Zahn Now, CNN Headline News, CNN International, ABC, CBS, FOX, MSNBC, ESPN.com, Oprah & Friends, Good Morning America Radio, Martha Stewart Radio, Fortune, Money Magazine, USA Today, Wall Street JournalNew York Times, Associated Press, Business Week, Body + Soul, Parents, Cosmopolitan, Glamour, Real Simple, Working Woman, Woman’s Day, and Parade. She has been featured in hundreds of articles in most major magazines and newspapers in American.

Dr. Hall is a contributing writer for PINK Magazine. She is also the Global Ambassador for the Unilever/Knorr Soup Campaign – Eat Soup, Live Healthy; World thought leader to Fortune 500 Corporations; Microsoft-MSN spokesperson, Electronic Arts spokesperson (Pogo.com); Darden Restaurant spokesperson, Tempur-Pedic spokesperson, Princess Cruise Line spokesperson. In fact, Martha Stewart Publications coined her as the “Stress Queen.”

Author of 3 books; Uncommon HOPE (Sourcebooks 2010), A Life in Balance: Nourishing the Four Roots of True Happiness (AMACOM, January 2006), 2008 Mom’s Choice Book Award winner, and winner of the prestigious 2007 Nautilus Book Award; and Alter Your Life: Overbooked? Overworked? Overwhelmed? (Oak Haven, April 2005), she offers simple methods for reducing stress, creating balance and living mindfully.

Dr. Hall earned a Bachelor of Science in Finance from Jacksonville State University, a Masters of Divinity from Emory University and a Doctorate in Spirituality from Columbia Theological Seminary. Her diverse background of study with medical pioneer’s including Dr. Dean Ornish of the Preventive Medicine Research Institute and Dr. Herbert Benson at the Harvard Mind/Body Institute as well as illustrious Nobel Peace Prize recipients including His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Bishop Desmond Tutu and President Jimmy Carter. Dr. Hall has perfected her expertise in these related fields—Where Science Meets the Soul®.

Dr. Hall lives on a horse farm with her family where she maintains a bird sanctuary and rescues animals outside of Atlanta, Georgia, and spends her weekdays working at The Stress Institute in Atlanta.

Specialties:

  • preventive medicine

Affiliation:

  • CEO, The Stress Institute CEO, The Mindful Living Network

Location:

  • Atlanta, GA

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Public Health:

    THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Combat experience is one of the factors that increases the risk that U.S. soldiers will start smoking, a new study suggests.

    Researchers analyzed data from a long-term study to assess the long-term health effects of service in the U.S. military...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Preventive Medicine:

    THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- E-cigarettes are booming among U.S. teens, with nearly 2.5 million middle and high school students now choosing to "vape" rather than smoke traditional cigarettes or indulge in other forms of tobacco, federal health officials reported Thursday.

    Full Article
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Gastroenterology:

    THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Americans have fewer types of intestinal bacteria than people in less-developed countries, according to a new study.

    The likely cause? Bacteria are less likely to be passed from person to person due to better sanitation and cleaner drinking wa...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- While many teenagers try electronic cigarettes, few become regular users, according to a new study.

    The research included more than 10,000 children from Wales who were asked about their use of e-cigarettes. About 1,600 children were between th...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Preventive Medicine:

    WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study raises concerns about the levels of chemicals used to flavor some brands of fluids used in electronic cigarettes.

    Flavorings used in e-cigarette fluids are mostly the same as those used in food and candy products, the study authors...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    MONDAY, April 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The "healthy glow" associated with a tan is actually a sign of danger, a dermatologist says.

    "The sad news is that unfortunately, no, there is no way to safely tan. The research is clear that there are not any cutoffs for how much sun is safe," ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Infectious Disease:

    MONDAY, April 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette smoke appears to strengthen a dreaded "superbug," new research in mice shows.

    Exposure to tobacco smoke prompts methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria to become even more aggressive, and makes it harder for th...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Epidemiology:

    THURSDAY, April 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women who were overweight as children and teens may have a greater risk of colon cancer, no matter what their current weight, a new study cautions.

    Researchers analyzed data from more than 75,000 American women and more than 34,000 American men....Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Public Health:

    TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic cigarettes are used by both smoking and nonsmoking teens, and are associated with drinking and other risky behaviors, a new study finds.

    "We found that e-cigarette access is strongly related to alcohol use in teenagers," said study au...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Addiction Medicine:

    MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that synthetic marijuana, also known as K2 or Spice, might harm the kidneys.

    "Use and abuse of these products have been tied to acute kidney injury in patients across the country," Kerry Willis, ch...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Preventive Medicine:

    MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Random drug testing in schools may sound like a good way to keep kids off drugs, but there is little evidence it works, the American Academy of Pediatrics says.

    In a new report, the nation's leading group of pediatricians reaffirms its stance aga...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Preventive Medicine:

    FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nicotine exposure from e-cigarettes may damage the developing brains of infants in the womb, as well as the brains of children and adolescents, suggests a new review of nicotine's effects.

    Animal experiments have shown that exposure to nicotine c...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Preventive Medicine:

    THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials on Thursday released a new round of graphic anti-smoking ads featuring former smokers living with the ravages of tobacco.

    The new ads highlight the benefits of quitting for the families of smokers and the importance of giv...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychiatry:

    THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Conventional wisdom says that abused children often grow up to be abusive parents, but a 30-year study of American families suggests it's more complicated than that.

    In one striking finding, researchers uncovered little evidence that physical a...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Public Health:

    WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Premature death rates have fallen in 60 percent of the counties in the United States in the past decade, a new report shows.

    In the District of Columbia, the premature death rate fell nearly one-third between 2004-06 and 2010-12, which was the...Full Article