Dr. John Lipman, MD

Bio

Dr. Lipman, Sharecare Editorial Advisory Board, is an internationally recognized expert in the treatment of uterine fibroids. He has given over 200 invited lectures on Women's Health topics including Harvard, Stanford, Vanderbilt, and Yale Medical Centers. He has appeared live on CNN with Wolf Blitzer and has been interviewed for USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, CNBC, Jet, The Health Network, Family Circle, and WebMD. Education: • MD: Georgetown University School of Medicine, Residency: • Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Fellowship: • Cardiovascular & Interventional Radiology Yale New-Haven Hospital, Yale Medical School.

Specialties:

  • interventional radiology
  • radiology

Affiliation:

  • Atlanta Interventional Institute

Location:

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Radiology:

    TUESDAY, Sept. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- An injected iodine-based substance often used to enhance the images produced by CT scans is safe for most patients, a new study reveals.

    The so-called contrast material is used in at least half of the 80 million or more CT scans performed in the...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Colon / Rectal Surgery:

    WEDNESDAY, Aug. 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors may be performing too many repeat colonoscopies on people who've had pre-cancerous polyps removed during an earlier colon cancer screening, a new Norwegian study suggests.

    Many of these patients have no greater risk of dying from colon ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Radiology:

    TUESDAY, Aug. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- An exercise component of the popular Nintendo Wii video game may help multiple sclerosis patients improve their balance by rewiring their brains, a new study suggests.

    No medications exist to preserve balance in MS patients, and some drugs make ...Full Article

  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Bleeding related to fibroids should first be treated medically. In the past non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAID, ex. ibuprofen) or oral contraceptive pills have been the most commonly used. More recently, tranexamic acid is a NSAID that has specific effects on the lining of the uterus...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Embolization is a procedure that cuts off the flow of blood in to an area that it previously supplied. Liver embolization takes advantage of the dual blood supply of the liver (hepatic artery and portal vein) and the fact the normal liver derives most of its supply from the portal vein, while cancerous...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    No. Birth control pills can decrease the heaviness of the flow, but they tend to increase fibroid growth. Fibroids are very hormone-responsive (estrogen as well as progesterone). It is why fibroids tend to grow (sometimes very rapidly) during pregnancy, and why they are also not typically an issue...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Varicose veins are dilated veins that can occur anywhere on the body, but are commonly seen in the legs. Varicose veins often enlarge significantly during pregnancy and with each subsequent pregnancy. Pregnant women may notice varicose veins in the labia and around the buttocks. Varicose veins in...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Varicose veins may be asymptomatic and only a cosmetic concern. They can also cause symptoms; most commonly a tired, dull achy feeling in the affected leg. This pain is worse when the person is standing and relieved by putting the feet up. Occasionally, the varicose veins can itch. There can also...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    No. Fibroids are benign tumors of the uterus. They may or may not cause symptoms to the woman, but irrespective of this, they do not cause any permanent damage to the uterus or other adjacent organs. The decision to treat fibroids is based entirely on whether or not there are significant symptoms experienced...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Fibroids are the most common female pelvic tumor. It affects 1 in every 3 women of childbearing age in the United States, and is seen even more frequently (as high as 80%) in African-American women. Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Yes, but only temporarily. Due to the concern of bone loss when using this medication, it can be given to women for a maximum of 6 months, and usually only given for 3 months. This is typically done in 3 monthly injections, although a single 3 month dose can be used as well. The medication also has side effects...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Portal vein embolization (PVE) is a procedure performed by Interventional Radiologists (IR). IRs are board-certified physicians who specialize in minimally invasive targeted treatments to treat medical conditions all over the body. The portal vein receives venous blood from the stomach and intestines...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Fibroids can cause significant symptoms most notably heavy menstrual bleeding, pelvic pain, and increased urinary frequency. The symptoms in some women can be severe enough to cause them to go to the Emergency Room for treatment. The heavy bleeding can cause profound anemia which can necessitate...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Fibroids are the most common benign pelvic tumor in women. While their cause is unknown, they are found in the uterus in women typically in their mid and later reproductive years. They do not increase a woman's risk for developing cancer. Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a condition where blood clots form most commonly in the deep veins of the legs or pelvis. These clots can break off and travel to the heart and lungs (aka pulmonary emboli) which increase the right heart pressures and can cause right heart failure or even death. 15-25%...Read More