Dr. John Lipman, MD

Bio

Dr. Lipman, Sharecare Editorial Advisory Board, is an internationally recognized expert in the treatment of uterine fibroids. He has given over 200 invited lectures on Women's Health topics including Harvard, Stanford, Vanderbilt, and Yale Medical Centers. He has appeared live on CNN with Wolf Blitzer and has been interviewed for USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, CNBC, Jet, The Health Network, Family Circle, and WebMD. Education: • MD: Georgetown University School of Medicine, Residency: • Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Fellowship: • Cardiovascular & Interventional Radiology Yale New-Haven Hospital, Yale Medical School.

Specialties:

  • interventional radiology
  • radiology

Affiliation:

  • Atlanta Interventional Institute

Location:

Activity

  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    A varicocele is a collection of varicose (dilated) and twisted veins in the scrotum. It is most commonly seen in youg men (ages 15-25), and usually involves the veins of the left side of the scrotum (although it can be bilateral).  Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    The Society of Interventional Radiology website can find Interventional Radiologists throughout the United States. The website is www.SIRweb.org. By choosing the state that you live in, you will see the cities in that state listed alphabetically. Under each city the individual IRs are listed also in&n...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    In the December 2011 issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Duke University researchers corroborated what many physicians have felt for many years, namely younger women who underwent hysterectomy had an approximate 2x increased incidence of early menopause. This early menopause increases a woman's risk...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Most commonly adenomyosis is discovered incidentally when the uterus is surgically removed for other reasons. While it can be diagnosed during hysterosalpingography (HSG) where contrast dye is injected in to the uterine cavity or with pelvic ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Endocrinology/diabetes/metabolism:

    TUESDAY, Nov. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Routine screening for heart disease isn't effective for people with diabetes who have no symptoms but are at high risk for a heart attack, according to a new study.

    Researchers found the screenings do not help prevent heart attacks or help patien...Full Article

  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE), also known as Uterine Artery Embolization (UAE) is performed by Interventional Radiologists (IRs), physicians who are trained in image-guided, minimally invasive targeted treatments for medical conditions all over the body.
    IRs place a thin catheter in to each uterine...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Yes. Uterine fibroids are the most common cause of heavy menstrual bleeding. Sometimes because the bleeding has been heavy for a long time, the woman doesn't recognize the amount of bleeding to be abnormal. Changing more than 8 pads a day or more frequently than every 3 hours is too often and should...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    The most common reason why hysterectomies are performed are uterine fibroids which are benign, non-cancerous tumors. It is important for women with symptomatic fibroids to know they do not need to undergo hysterectomy. Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE) performed by Interventional Radiologists (IRs)...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    As with uterine fibroids, there are surgical and non-surgical treatment options. However, whether adenomyosis is diffuse or less commonly focal, its infiltrative nature makes it impossible to surgically remove the adenomyosis. Therefore, the only surgical treatment option for patients suffering with...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    No. Birth control pills can decrease the heaviness of the flow, but they tend to increase fibroid growth. Fibroids are very hormone-responsive (estrogen as well as progesterone). It is why fibroids tend to grow (sometimes very rapidly) during pregnancy, and why they are also not typically an issue...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Radiology:

    THURSDAY, Oct. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There are clear differences in the brains of people with chronic fatigue syndrome and the brains of healthy people, new research indicates.

    Scientists at Stanford University School of Medicine said their findings could help doctors diagnose thi...Full Article

  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    No one know what causes fibroids. They are typically seen in women of child-bearing age and more common in African-American women than women of other racial groups. Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Yes. Fibroids are firm hard tumors which commonly cause increased urinary frequency and routine nocturia (waking up in the middle of the night to urinate). They can also cause urgency to urinate, bladder pressure, and even incontinence (urinary leaking). Fibroids that are located anteriorly (in front) of the uterus&...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    While surgical repair is often used to correct a varicocele, recent studies have shown that a non-surgical varicocele embolization procedure results in a lower recurrence rate, and allows the patient to avoid surgery. Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Fibroids can directly and indirectly cause constipation. The uterus lies directly in front of the distal end of the colon (i.e. rectosigmoid region). Fibroids that develop in the back of the uterus can press on the colon from the outside, and in some cases, cause significant constipation. Women that have f...Read More