Dr. John Lipman, MD

Bio

Dr. Lipman, Sharecare Editorial Advisory Board, is an internationally recognized expert in the treatment of uterine fibroids. He has given over 200 invited lectures on Women's Health topics including Harvard, Stanford, Vanderbilt, and Yale Medical Centers. He has appeared live on CNN with Wolf Blitzer and has been interviewed for USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, CNBC, Jet, The Health Network, Family Circle, and WebMD. Education: • MD: Georgetown University School of Medicine, Residency: • Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Fellowship: • Cardiovascular & Interventional Radiology Yale New-Haven Hospital, Yale Medical School.

Specialties:

  • interventional radiology
  • radiology

Affiliation:

  • Atlanta Interventional Institute

Location:

Activity

  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    No. Birth control pills can decrease the heaviness of the flow, but they tend to increase fibroid growth. Fibroids are very hormone-responsive (estrogen as well as progesterone). It is why fibroids tend to grow (sometimes very rapidly) during pregnancy, and why they are also not typically an issue...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Radiology:

    THURSDAY, Oct. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There are clear differences in the brains of people with chronic fatigue syndrome and the brains of healthy people, new research indicates.

    Scientists at Stanford University School of Medicine said their findings could help doctors diagnose thi...Full Article

  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    No one know what causes fibroids. They are typically seen in women of child-bearing age and more common in African-American women than women of other racial groups. Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Yes. Fibroids are firm hard tumors which commonly cause increased urinary frequency and routine nocturia (waking up in the middle of the night to urinate). They can also cause urgency to urinate, bladder pressure, and even incontinence (urinary leaking). Fibroids that are located anteriorly (in front) of the uterus&...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    While surgical repair is often used to correct a varicocele, recent studies have shown that a non-surgical varicocele embolization procedure results in a lower recurrence rate, and allows the patient to avoid surgery. Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Fibroids can directly and indirectly cause constipation. The uterus lies directly in front of the distal end of the colon (i.e. rectosigmoid region). Fibroids that develop in the back of the uterus can press on the colon from the outside, and in some cases, cause significant constipation. Women that have f...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Symptomatic uterine fibroids do not necessarily need surgery at all. Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE) performed by an Interventional Radiologist (IR) is a non-surgical procedure which has been shown to be an effective treatment method for symptomatic fibroids. If after consultation with an IR that...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    To understand adenomyosis, one needs to understand the layers of the uterus. There are 3 main layers of the uterus: endometrium, myometrium, and perimetrium. The endometrium is the thin lining of the uterus. It is what sheds with each menstrual cycle resulting in the passage of the menstrual blood. The m...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Varicoceles can present with testicular/scrotal pain or discovered incidentally during an infertility work-up (i.e. varicoceles can lead to diminished/absent sperm counts). Varicoceles can be felt on physical exam or be detected on a scrotal ultrasound. Having the patient bear down (Valsalva) is an im...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Interventional Radiologists (IRs) are physicians who specialize in minimally invasive, targeted treatments for medical conditions throughout the body. They use x-ray or other imaging (exs. ultrasound, CT, or MRI) to guide a catheter inside the body to the treatment site. Many conditions that once required...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Yes. There are a number of medicines used to treat uterine fibroids. The most common medications are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDs) and oral contraceptive pills (OCPs). An example of an NSAID is ibuprofen which is being replaced more commonly by a different NSAID tranexamic acid. This...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    No. While no one knows what causes uterine fibroids to form, they are not contagious. There is a genetic component to the development of uterine fibroids and this is most commonly seen in women of African-American ancestry. Therefore, it is particularly important for these women if they suffer with...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Adenomyosis more commonly diffusely thickens the junctional zone, but can be present in a more focal form (adenomyoma) which can simulate a fibroid, particularly if one only relies on pelvic ultrasound for imaging (vs. MRI). It can cause generalized enlargement of the uterus which (like fibroids) can...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neurology:

    FRIDAY, Oct. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Brain scans are helping scientists better understand the bond between people and their beloved pets.

    The study included 14 women who had at least one child between the ages of 2 and 10 and one dog that had been in the household for two or more year...Full Article

  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    If a woman has fibroids but does not have symptoms, no treatment is necessary. For mild symptoms, lifestyle modifications may be all that is necessary. For example estrogen (which stimulates fibroid growth and why fibroids can grow during pregnancy and typically not an issue once the woman is in menopause)...Read More