Dr. John Lipman, MD

Bio

Dr. Lipman, Sharecare Editorial Advisory Board, is an internationally recognized expert in the treatment of uterine fibroids. He has given over 200 invited lectures on Women's Health topics including Harvard, Stanford, Vanderbilt, and Yale Medical Centers. He has appeared live on CNN with Wolf Blitzer and has been interviewed for USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, CNBC, Jet, The Health Network, Family Circle, and WebMD. Education: • MD: Georgetown University School of Medicine, Residency: • Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Fellowship: • Cardiovascular & Interventional Radiology Yale New-Haven Hospital, Yale Medical School.

Specialties:

  • interventional radiology
  • radiology

Affiliation:

  • Atlanta Interventional Institute

Activity

  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Rarely. Fibroids are typically seen in women of child-bearing age; most commonly between ages 30-55. However, women in their twenties and even on rare occasions women in their late teens will have fibroids detected. African-American women not only have a higher incidence of fibroids than other racial...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    If you have fibroids and no symptoms, no treatment is necessary. You should continue all routine screening examinations and check-ups. If you develop significant symptoms, you should schedule an appointment right away with your healthcare provider to discuss these. The most notable are:
    • Heavy menstrual bleeding:
    ...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Emergency Medicine:

    TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly all emergency room doctors surveyed order pricey MRIs or CT scans their patients may not need, mainly because they fear malpractice lawsuits, according to a new report.

    Of 435 ER physicians who completed the survey, 97 percent admitted to...Full Article

  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    It can be. Depending on where the fibroids are located will determine what if any symptoms the woman may experience. Fibroids located centrally in the uterus can displace the lining causing heavy menstrual flow. Those that are in the anterior part of the uterus can compress the bladder causing in...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Yes. Particularly in African-American families and more so than other racial groups. Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    It can be. If there is a fibroid that is located in the back of the uterus and it is of sufficient size, it can compress the adjacent colon and cause constipation. Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neurology:

    WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they have developed a new scoring system to help identify seniors who are at high risk for memory and thinking problems that might lead to dementia.

    "Our goal is to identify memory issues at the earliest possible stages," wrote...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Orthopedics:

    TUESDAY, March 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most current guidelines suggest that when seniors report new back pain to their primary care physician they should quickly be sent for diagnostic imaging, such as CT scans or MRIs.

    But a new study suggests that early imaging may actually be a wa...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    TUESDAY, March 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As many as one of every four breast tissue biopsies tested for cancer may have been incorrectly diagnosed by pathologists taking part in a study to test their skills.

    The pathologists did well at identifying invasive breast cancer, but they stru...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    SUNDAY, March 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that CT scans may help doctors do a better job of diagnosing heart disease in patients with chest pain, compared to standard tests.

    A Scottish team found that CT scans seemed to spot more heart problems and allowed doctors ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    SATURDAY, March 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In the first head-to-head study of its kind, researchers say that CT scans may offer some advantages over traditional "functional stress tests" for people with symptoms of heart disease.

    As explained in a news release from the American College ...Full Article

  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    "Watchful waiting" is recommended when fibroids are present in the uterus but not currently causing any symptoms to the woman. This means that the woman is not being treated with any specific therapy for her fibroids. She will continue to be on the lookout for the development of any symptoms which...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The overuse of expensive medical imaging such as MRI and CT scans is an ongoing cause of concern. Now, a study finds that if you're an American with low-risk prostate or breast cancer, your odds for getting an unnecessary scan vary based on where you

    ...Full Article
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Radiology:

    THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Boosting older adults' colon cancer screening rates to 80 percent by 2018 would lead to 21,000 fewer deaths from the cancer each year in the United States by 2030, a new study suggests.

    Colon cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in the Uni...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Radiology:

    WEDNESDAY, March 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Preliminary research in mice raises the possibility that an ultrasound-based treatment might help eliminate plaque buildup in the brain that's associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    Scientists don't know whether the approach is feasible for hum...Full Article