Dr. John Lipman, MD

Bio

Dr. Lipman, Sharecare Editorial Advisory Board, is an internationally recognized expert in the treatment of uterine fibroids. He has given over 200 invited lectures on Women's Health topics including Harvard, Stanford, Vanderbilt, and Yale Medical Centers. He has appeared live on CNN with Wolf Blitzer and has been interviewed for USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, CNBC, Jet, The Health Network, Family Circle, and WebMD. Education: • MD: Georgetown University School of Medicine, Residency: • Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Fellowship: • Cardiovascular & Interventional Radiology Yale New-Haven Hospital, Yale Medical School.

Specialties:

  • interventional radiology
  • radiology

Affiliation:

  • Atlanta Interventional Institute

Location:

Activity

  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Yes it can. If a fibroid is of sufficient size it can press on pelvic nerves to cause pain that can be felt in the pelvis which can radiate in to the lower back, hip, buttock, or down the leg. This is often worse just before or during the menses. Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    No. Most women that have fibroids have no symptoms. They are termed "passenger" fibroids as they "ride along" in the uterus without causing any symptoms. Depending on size and location, fibroids can cause pain in the pelvis which can radiate in to the lower back, hip, buttocks, groin, and even down...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    There are 3 main types of fibroids as determined by their location in the uterus. The submucosal fibroids are located in the central most portion of the uterus, along the lining or on occasion located entirely in the cavity of the uterus. These are responsible for the heavy bleeding that can be seen...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Yes. Uterine sarcoma is an extremely rare malignant tumor of the uterus. The standard treatment would be to remove the entire uterus (i.e. hysterectomy). While a woman suffering with a uterine sarcoma would not be able to carry/deliver a baby (without her uterus), she could consider in vitro fertilization...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Conventional wisdom has it that high levels of testosterone help prostate cancers grow.

    However, a new, small study suggests that a treatment strategy called bipolar androgen therapy -- where patients alternate between low and high levels of tes...Full Article

  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Fibroids can cause pain in 2 distinct ways:
    • By causing heavy menstrual flow which includes passage of blood clots. When these clots travel from the uterus through the cervix in to the vagina this elicits pain.
    • Fibroids that are large enough to press on adjacent pelvic nerves can cause pelvic
    ...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    No. By definition menopause is the complete cessation of menstrual bleeding for 12 consecutive months. This often occurs in women between 45-50 years of age, although a number of women go well in to their fifties before going in to menopause. Women over 40 years of age who are still menstruating (i.e. perimeno...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    "Menstrual migraines" can also be due to significant anemia from heavy periods caused by uterine fibroids. Other signs of anemia that can accompany these migraines might include significant lethargy and weakness, episodes of lightheadedness/dizziness, or heart palpitations. Patients may also chew...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychiatry:

    TUESDAY, Dec. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Though most patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) can be successfully treated with medication and therapy, between 10 percent to 20 percent have a form of the illness that doesn't respond to standard care, experts say.

    However, patien...Full Article

  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Yes. HHT (Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder. There is usually one parent that has the affected gene (Aa) and one that does not (aa). That results in 4 possible combinations: 2 are normal (aa) and two have the disorder (Aa). Genetic testing can be done in families with...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    Yes. "Female cancer" is a cancer of the female reproductive tract. If a patient has undergone complete hysterectomy with removal of the entire uterus, ovaries, and fallopian tubes, she could still develop a cancer in the remaining structures (ex. vulva/vagina). Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    HHT is Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia. It is also known as Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. It is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder. The Curacao Diagnostic Criteria are used to characterize the likelihood that a particular patient has HHT. The 4 criteria are: 1. Spontaneous and recurrent nosebleeds...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    A varicocele is a varicose vein(s) involving the veins that drain the testicles/scrotum. They result from the same mechanism that causes varicose veins in other parts of the body. The venous dilatation comes from venous hypertension exacerbated by gravity causing incompetent veins. This changes the di...Read More
  • John Lipman, MD - Atlanta, GA - Interventional Radiology
    John Lipman, MD answered:
    It would be very unlikely. Increasing age (over 35) decreases fertility, and it is markedly diminished at age 50. Fibroids also can hinder a woman's fertility, and there may even be a negative impact on fertility from Uterine Artery Embolization (UAE) similar to that seen with women that undergo surgery...Read More