Dr. Ellen Marmur, MD

Bio

Dr. Ellen Marmur is a leading dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon. She is a recognized and admired expert in skin cancer diagnosis and surgery, Mohs surgery reconstructive surgery, cosmetic surgery, and women'€™s health dermatology. In addition to her private practice, Dr. Marmur is an Associate Clinical Professor in both the Department of Dermatology and the Department of Genetics & Genomic Research at The Mount Sinai Medical Center.

Specialties:

Location:

  • New York, NY

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    WEDNESDAY, Dec. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Airline pilots get as much exposure to cancer-causing UV rays in an hourlong flight as they would during 20 minutes in a tanning bed, new research finds.

    The study, led by Dr. Martina Sanlorenzo, from the University of California, San Francisco...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Most of the ingredients in any product are inactive. Their secondary function is to benefit the skin directly. These substances work together to create a base that carries the active ingredients (a moisturizer, detergent, or sunscreen), and, as a by-product, they can also benefit the skin. Some of these (especially...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Omega-6 is found in:
    • Seeds
    • Nuts
    • Eggs
    • Sunflower and soybean oil (which are in lots of snack foods, such as crackers, cookies, and cereals)
    Omega-3 is found in:
    • Cold-water fish such as salmon and sardines,
    • Flaxseed oil
    • Walnuts
    • Sunflower seeds
    • Almonds
    Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Yes! Male skin is totally different from female skin on some levels and exactly the same on others.

    Male hormones tend to produce more oil on a man's face than a woman's. But, if men shave every day, that exfoliates the skin, which can lead to dryness. And using shaving cream, which is a form...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    There are six explanations for dark circles, and accurately diagnosing which one is your particular issue will be key to finding a remedy.

    One is infraorbital hyperpigmentation, darkness concentrated on this area of skin, which is a genetic trait. To find out if that is your problem, gently pull...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Zinc is found in turkey, almonds, Brazil nuts, and wheat germ. This anti-inflammatory mineral calms irritation in the epidermis and helps to heal acne and treat rosacea. It also facilitates cell regeneration. Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    From a doctor's perspective, the only real "skin type" classifications are Fitzpatrick Skin Types 1 to 6. Categorized by skin color, they gauge how a skin type responds to the sun. They may reflect ethnic variations in skin color as well. Type 1 is extremely fair and prone to sunburns, while Type 6 is very dark skin...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Muscle movement during exercise assists the circulation by squeezing the blood upward. So a regular exercise program - whether it's walking, running, swimming, or biking - will help greatly. Standing in one place for long periods of time can increase the risk of developing the condition if you are already...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Having too much hair in male patterns (on the abdomen or the face, for instance) is either hormonal or a normal ethnic variation. A lot of Greek, Italian, and Eastern European women have hypertrichosis to some extent. Many Asian women have dark peach fuzz (or vellus hairs) on their cheeks. Hair growth...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Sensing any kind of danger in the skin, the Langerhans cells, located in the epidermis and the dermis, are like the air traffic controllers of the immune system. They send out special agents- immune cells such as T cells and B cells - to capture foreign invaders such as bacteria and viruses, and...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    There are two types of acne: comedonal (blackheads or whiteheads) and inflammatory (pimples). Dermatologists diagnose acne as mild, moderate, or severe. (Do not be alarmed if a dermatologist refers to you one or two zits as "acne.". Doctors do not use the term "breakouts," so acne from our perspective...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    WEDNESDAY, Nov. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that genes tied to blue eyes and red hair could put people at higher risk for moles or freckling in childhood, which are often precursors to the deadly skin cancer melanoma later in life.

    Howeve...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    A hypersensitivity to sun and other factors cause blood vessels near the skin to dilate. This rush of circulation makes the complexion appear red and sets off a vicious cycle of inflammatory cells rushing to the area and triggering angiogenesis (the growth of more blood vessels). The body's wound...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with advanced melanoma may live longer when treated with a combination of the cancer drug Yervoy and the immune system booster sargramostim, a new study finds.

    Patients given the two drugs had a median survival of 17.5 months, compared to...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Housed inside the hair follicle are stem cells, "pluripotential" cells that have the capacity to develop into any kind of cell they're needed to become. They can turn into collagen, skin, or immune cells if necessary, but once they have specialized they can't change again. Stem cells are similar to wild...Read More