Dr. Ellen Marmur, MD

Bio

Dr. Ellen Marmur is a leading dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon. She is a recognized and admired expert in skin cancer diagnosis and surgery, Mohs surgery reconstructive surgery, cosmetic surgery, and women'€™s health dermatology. In addition to her private practice, Dr. Marmur is an Associate Clinical Professor in both the Department of Dermatology and the Department of Genetics & Genomic Research at The Mount Sinai Medical Center.

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Activity

  • Ellen Marmur, MD
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:

    The functions of the ingredients in a cosmetic are as follows:

    • They moisturize, using humectant and emollient ingredients.
    • They bind, holding other ingredients together.
    • They emulsify, blending oil and water substances together in a
             smooth formula.
    • They thicken or smooth, making a formula richer
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  • Ellen Marmur, MD
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:

    As far as the cosmetic components go, they must be listed in descending order by quantity. So if water is the first ingredient listed, it's the most plentiful element in the product. If an antioxidant is last on the list, there's probably just a trace of it included. You should question whether that

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  • Ellen Marmur, MD
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:

    No. If they did, I suppose we'd all be using them. Consider that the neurotoxin botulinum type A (Botox, PureTox, and other new formulations) is injected directly into a muscle to block its nerve receptors and temporarily paralyze it. A topical product has low odds of penetrating to the dermis and

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  • Ellen Marmur, MD
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:

    Many precancers, such as actinic keratosis, are in the epidermis. Because they are on the surface of the skin, fairly invasive chemical peels such as a 30% trichloracetic acid (TCA) peel and also fractionated laser or CO2 laser resurfacing of the skin can take them off. These methods literally burn

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  • Ellen Marmur, MD
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:

    When a hair gets trapped and starts growing underneath the skin, it can create a bump and cause folliculitis, an inflammation of the hair follicle. Inflammatory cells (neutrophils) race to the area to kill bacteria around the jagged ingrown hair that is penetrating the follicular wall. This neutr

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  • Ellen Marmur, MD
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:

    The following biopsy methods are used for skin cancer:

    Shave: This is a minimally invasive biopsy. We use a flexible surgical blade to do a very superficial, paper-thin section of the lesion. (For lack of a better image, this is a bit like a cheese slicer that cuts a perfect, sheer circle of Parmesan.)

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  • Ellen Marmur, MD
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:

    An ingredient must be tiny enough to get through the epidermis or the pores. For example, the collagen molecule is far too large to penetrate past the surface of the skin. It can only sit on top. This is why nanotechnology (a nanometer is a billionth of a meter) and microencapsulation are hot topics

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  • Ellen Marmur, MD
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:

    Whether you use a chemical or mechanical exfoliant or one that incorporates both, be careful to apply it for only a short time. An acid works immediately, so it doesn't need to be on your face for more than three or four minutes. Wash it off right away if it hurts or stings (it should create a tingling

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  • Ellen Marmur, MD
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:

    There are things you can eat that definitely benefit the skin in particular, and deficiencies of certain nutrients are damaging. A lack of protein can lead to poor wound healing and hair loss, and a fat deficiency can bring on dry skin and brittle hair and nails. A lack of vitamin C can cause scurvy

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  • Ellen Marmur, MD
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:

    A Wood's lamp is a handheld ultraviolet "black" light that enhances the appearance of pigmented lesions. It helps reveal melanomas at an early stage. This is the same kind of light used in spas (the one that makes your face appear to be a map of sun damage). To a doctor's naked eye, a lesion on s

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  • Ellen Marmur, MD
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:

    Glycerin soap is a transparent soap with added glycerin (a vegetable oil moisturizing agent). Products such as Neutrogena's Transparent Facial Bar, for instance, may be milder and more moisturizing due to the glycerin, but they still contain soap ingredients such as sodium cocoate and tallowate.

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  • Ellen Marmur, MD
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:

    Because genetics is a strong factor, stretch marks are difficult to prevent. Moisturizing the skin and avoiding large weight loss or gain may help. Some women swear by using lubricating oils and ointments on the belly during their pregnancy.

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  • Ellen Marmur, MD
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:

    A dermatoscope is a handheld device that uses polarized light to magnify an area ten times. The features of a brown spot become more prominent and the pattern of pigment can be seen clearly (lesions may look gray, blue, red, or black under the dermatoscope). Most important, dermoscopy helps evaluate

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  • Ellen Marmur, MD
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:

    In the case of telogen effluvium, it is more of a waiting process for the growth cycle to go back to normal. Some believe that biotin or vitamin B12 shots can help, but a healthy diet sans supplements is sufficient. Minoxidil (Rogaine) has been very effective at halting more hair loss, but there

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  • Ellen Marmur, MD
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:

    A prescription cream, 5-fluorouracil, destroys mutant cells and causes an inflammatory reaction. It is applied to a precancerous area for approximately four to eight weeks. Theoretically this is considered chemotherapy because it utilizes chemicals, but the term scares people. (The primary side effect

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