Dr. Ellen Marmur, MD

Bio

Dr. Ellen Marmur is a leading dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon. She is a recognized and admired expert in skin cancer diagnosis and surgery, Mohs surgery reconstructive surgery, cosmetic surgery, and women'€™s health dermatology. In addition to her private practice, Dr. Marmur is an Associate Clinical Professor in both the Department of Dermatology and the Department of Genetics & Genomic Research at The Mount Sinai Medical Center.

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Activity

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    The food you put into your mouth has an effect once it's been metabolized and delivered to the skin. The way it is metabolized is also why eating certain foods, though beneficial to both the skin and body, may not affect the complexion directly. The body breaks down what we eat into tiny particles of proteins, fats,...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    A broad-spectrum body lotion with an SPF of 15 is better than nothing but not as protective as the broad-spectrum sunblock (with the harder-core sunscreens and blockers) that you might wear poolside. Most daily moisturizers with SPF add one or two chemical sunscreens and maybe one chemical UVA blocker (remember...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    In general, look for a broad-spectrum product that protects against both UVA and UVB radiation. (UVC wavelengths are much shorter, and don't penetrate the atmosphere.) A facial lotion that contains one or two chemical sunscreens and at least one sunblock (titanium dioxide or zinc oxide) is perfectly adequate....Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Just beneath the Gore-tex of the stratum corneum lies the brick wall of the epidermis. The "bricks" are squamous cells (durable keratinocytes that will eventually move up to the stratum corneum and be sloughed off) held together with rope-like bridges. The mortar is filled with fatty ceramides, which act as glue between the cells....Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    It's important to realize that skin does not exist in a vacuum. The way it reacts is tied to everything in your life. If you wake up and have pimples, you need to ask yourself, "Am I under stress?" "Did I eat something strange?" "Am I getting my period?" To evaluate what kind of skin you are having (and...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Wildly fluctuating hormones during pregnancy can create an awful complexion or a radiant glow, often in the same woman. For the first twelve weeks, the growth hormone human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) surges to prepare the placenta and increase the blood volume in the body. (This can create a flushed, healthy complexion...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    You are actually quite lucky if you have this kind of complexion, because it's resilient. You can use almost anything you want on it. I consider combination skin like yours to be the closest thing to a "normal" skin type. Because your skin is neither too oily, too dry, nor too sensitive, feel free to use whatever formulations or i...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    The fibroblast cells' extremely important function is to make collagen and elastin (the darlings of the cosmeceutical world). The skin's healing process is driven by these cells, which race to repair skin by making a scar or replenishing collagen to rebuild the structural integrity of the skin. It's p...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    FRIDAY, Sept. 5, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A growing knowledge of the skin disease called psoriasis is leading to greater treatment choices, including personalized therapies, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration reports.

    Psoriasis is an immune system disorder that causes overproduction of...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    THURSDAY, Sept. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Keytruda (pembrolizumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer.

    Melanoma, accounting for about 5 percent of new cancers in the United States, is expected to be diagnos...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    The common sun protection ingredients having UVA protection are: 
    • Avobenzone (Parsol 1789) the only chemical that protects against
             the entire UVA spectrum (long and short rays), but it needs an
             added photostabilizer (such as Helioplex) to prevent breakdown
             in the sun
    ...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Beneath the elaborately woven levels of the epidermis lies the cement-like basement membrane, which glues the epidermis to the dermis. Lying under all those strata, the dermis seems as if it would be deeper down, but it's only one millimeter past the surface of your skin- less than the thickness...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    WEDNESDAY, Sept. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Airline pilots and flight crews may face as much as twice the risk of the type of skin cancer known as melanoma compared with the general population, according to a new analysis of existing research.

    However, it's not clear whether exposure to...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    The reasons behind your skin's behavior provide not only clues to a prescription but a way to prevent a problem from happening. If you learn that using a certain type of topical ingredient or eating a particular kind of food exacerbates a condition, you can avoid it. For instance, eating spicy food...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    You need to apply moisturizer on your dry skin. If your skin becomes red or gets irritated or stings when you put on any kind of moisturizer, it is being sensitive. In response, you can use products with anti-inflammatory ingredients such as aloe vera and soy. And stay away from irritating substances...Read More