Dr. Ellen Marmur, MD

Bio

Dr. Ellen Marmur is a leading dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon. She is a recognized and admired expert in skin cancer diagnosis and surgery, Mohs surgery reconstructive surgery, cosmetic surgery, and women'€™s health dermatology. In addition to her private practice, Dr. Marmur is an Associate Clinical Professor in both the Department of Dermatology and the Department of Genetics & Genomic Research at The Mount Sinai Medical Center.

Specialties:

Location:

  • New York, NY

Activity

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    The link between nutrition and acne is still controversial, and many medical studies are still to be done on the subject. But this much is scientifically proven: chocolate has gotten a bad rap as the instigator of pimple production. It has been proven that chocolate does not cause or aggravate the...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    As a woman begins to go through menopause, her hormone levels begin a steep drop-off. Sweating through hot flashes and dryness are the top skin complaints during this time, because estrogen and progesterone aren't telling the sebaceous glands to pump out as much oil. Lower levels of these hormones also diminish an...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    All these devices deliver heat to the skin by way of an energy source, through different variations of light or radio frequency. Lasers work with a monochromatic wavelength of light generated by liquid dye, crystals (like ruby or alexandrite), metal (a semiconductor like a diode), or gases (like...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new drug to treat adults with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis was approved Wednesday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    People with plaque psoriasis, the most common form of the autoimmune skin disease, develop thick, red skin wit...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The anti-psoriasis drug Cosentyx (secukinumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    Psoriasis in an immune system disorder that causes red, scaly patches of skin. It occurs most often in people aged 15 to 35, and among th...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Keep the skin moisturized with a super-thick emollient ointment. This forms a protective barrier that allows the skin to heal faster and also helps with scabbing. Do not pick at peeling skin. Never, ever, ever pick! This dead surface layer is retained by the body until it resurfaces itself. Pulling off skin...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Acne triggers can be hormonal changes (which is why so many teenagers and pregnant women suffer from it). Instigators also include genetics, certain foods, and stress. Anything irritating that is put on your skin or done to it, intentionally or not (from a glycolic lotion to scrubbing too hard),...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research dispels the widely held belief that spiders are a common cause of skin infections in people.

    "Although spider bite may be an attractive and tenable causative agent of a bacterial infection, the data show this is highly improbable," the...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    I notice that a lot of people look into cosmetic dermatology when they're switching jobs. They think an aesthetic improvement will make them feel stronger and more confident. And it will. In this youth-oriented society, an exhausted appearance doesn't give them an edge. I see lots of women (and many men) who have...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Psoriasis is more than just a troublesome skin condition for millions of Americans -- it also causes up to $135 billion a year in direct and indirect costs, a new study shows.

    According to data included in the study, about 3.2 percent of the U.S...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    In the case of telogen effluvium, it is more of a waiting process for the growth cycle to go back to normal. Some believe that biotin or vitamin B12 shots can help, but a healthy diet sans supplements is sufficient. Minoxidil (Rogaine) has been very effective at halting more hair loss, but there...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Telogen effluvium, which is temporary, diffuse hair loss, commonly occurs due to stress or physical trauma, and it is often associated with hormonal imbalances. It can happen after having a baby or as a result of an illness, surgery, or emotional turmoil. Hair growth and shedding happen in three phases...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    First a doctor will rule out any medical condition that may be causing hormonal hair growth. The growth of lots of vellus hair, for example, can be a sign of polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    Dermatologists employ nonablative lasers (the kind that don't damage the epidermis) to dramatically reduce hair permanently....Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    It's true that the low-humidity, dry-air environment inside a pressurized plane cabin is totally moisture-sapping. (There's usually 10 percent less moisture on a plane than inside your house.) Your skin and lips, even your eyes, become very dry almost immediately. But misting water on your face i...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Once you've located one or two candidates, schedule a consultation. You won't insult one physician by meeting with another before you make a decision. Speaking with more than one doctor is important and accepted protocol. (Consultations can be expensive. You might ask the doctor if you can apply the consultation fee toward your...Read More