Dr. Ellen Marmur, MD

Bio

Dr. Ellen Marmur is a leading dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon. She is a recognized and admired expert in skin cancer diagnosis and surgery, Mohs surgery reconstructive surgery, cosmetic surgery, and women'€™s health dermatology. In addition to her private practice, Dr. Marmur is an Associate Clinical Professor in both the Department of Dermatology and the Department of Genetics & Genomic Research at The Mount Sinai Medical Center.

Specialties:

Activity

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    If you get a really bad flu or a fever, three to six months later you may notice a white horizontal band or indentation on some of your nails. It's called a Beau's line, and indicates that the nails stopped growing during a period of physical or emotional stress. Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- If you plan to exfoliate, get some professional advice first, a dermatologist suggests.

    "Before you exfoliate, you really need to understand your skin and skin type," Dr. Mary Lupo, a clinical professor of dermatology at Tulane University School...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Topical hydroquinone, a derivative of benzene, does not literally bleach the skin but suppresses overactive melanocytes and slows down the pigment-making process. Hydroquinone alone is applied directly onto the dark spot and slowly erases it within at least six months (although it could be sooner). It...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sprains and fractures aren't the only hazards athletes face. Certain skin problems are also common among sports enthusiasts.

    The five skin conditions most often seen in athletes are blisters; turf burn (abrasions from falls on an artificial surf...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    The sun has an extraordinary direct impact on the skin. But in a nutshell, imagine the sun's rays as being like a laser gun, disintegrating your collagen and destroying your cells' DNA. It's almost that simple. The sun can be blamed for over one million new cancers each year, affecting approximately...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many acne patients do not take all their recommended medications, a small new study suggests.

    Researchers surveyed 143 acne patients and found that 27 percent of them did not obtain or use all of the prescription and over-the-counter products sug...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Some people have clubbing, and the tips of the nails are curved and slightly bulbous. This usually occurs in patients who have congestive heart failure or smoke too much (because not enough oxygen is reaching the tips of their fingers). It's almost a form of a scar. The clubbing may go away if the...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- While most white people who develop skin cancer are older men, the reverse is true in Asian and Hispanic populations, a new study suggests.

    Researchers contend that shifting preferences for tanning among Asians and Hispanics in the United States ...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Water has always been thought to provide benefits for the skin, but drinking huge amounts of it isn't going to make you look even better. The body will simply eliminate the excess through urination. However, water intoxication is a real, although uncommon condition, and it can kill you. It causes cells and...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    FRIDAY, March 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The first genetic factors associated with the skin disorder rosacea have been identified by researchers.

    More than 16 million people in the United States have rosacea, an incurable skin condition that causes symptoms such as redness, visible bloo...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Being over- or underweight has negative effects on the body overall but doesn't have a huge influence on skin unless the loss or gain is extreme. Obesity, for example, puts a great deal of stress on the entire body and leads to swelling and skin breakdown. Researchers at Harvard University recently found...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Texturizers are substances that thicken or add slip to a product, so it can be applied smoothly. They literally add a rich texture to a cream or lotion.

    The common texturizers used are:
    • Alkyl benzoate (also an emollient)
    • Carbomer
    • Polymers (in the form of either polyethylene glycol or natura
    ...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eczema isn't just a painful, chronic problem for many -- it's a big drain on the pocketbook, too, a new study finds.

    Researchers at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago report that adults with eczema have higher health...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Using common sense and adjusting your skin care products are the keys. With every season, reclassify your skin "type" and reevaluate your regimen based on that. Your skin will let you know what it needs: Is it feeling oily, dry, or irritated? Is it breaking out much more? In a warm, humid climate you may want to use an...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    In response to skin irritation (whether from an allergic reaction or product overkill) or when someone simply has no idea what kind of basics his or her skin may need, he needs to stop everything at once. Your skin needs to get back to its natural balance or imbalance with no intervention from topical...Read More