Dr. Ellen Marmur, MD

Bio

Dr. Ellen Marmur is a leading dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon. She is a recognized and admired expert in skin cancer diagnosis and surgery, Mohs surgery reconstructive surgery, cosmetic surgery, and women'€™s health dermatology. In addition to her private practice, Dr. Marmur is an Associate Clinical Professor in both the Department of Dermatology and the Department of Genetics & Genomic Research at The Mount Sinai Medical Center.

Specialties:

Location:

  • New York, NY

Activity

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Some people are genetically inclined toward sensitive skin, but we all have the potential to acquire it. Overdoing products that break down the stratum corneum cause irritant contact dermatitis and will trigger an immune response as part of the body's healing mechanism. For instance, mixing and m...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    MONDAY, April 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The "healthy glow" associated with a tan is actually a sign of danger, a dermatologist says.

    "The sad news is that unfortunately, no, there is no way to safely tan. The research is clear that there are not any cutoffs for how much sun is safe," ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of deadly melanoma skin cancer is falling among American children, a new study finds.

    Researchers led by Dr. Lisa Campbell, of Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center in Cleveland, looked a...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    There are things you can eat that definitely benefit the skin in particular, and deficiencies of certain nutrients are damaging. A lack of protein can lead to poor wound healing and hair loss, and a fat deficiency can bring on dry skin and brittle hair and nails. A lack of vitamin C can cause scurvy (yes, even...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Like sunglasses, the right kind of clothing provides an effective physical block to the sun. But a white T-shirt won't do much good; it has an SPF of only 5 (and when wet it goes down to SPF 2). Darker colors absorb more light, and tighter-constructed fabrics are better barriers. I think UV-protective clothing...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    WEDNESDAY, April 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- More than 20 percent of Medicare patients with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, face delays in getting surgical treatment, a new study reveals.

    Researchers evaluated more than 32,000 melanoma patients covered by Medicare, the public...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Most of the information about nutrition for the skin centers on eating nourishing fruits, vegetables, fish, and whole grains- a balanced diet, basically, that will impact your complexion in a positive way. And it will- in the same way that most of these other intrinsic factors, such as medications you...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    People with sensitive skin run the gamut from those with a fair-skinned, delicate complexion, to someone with rosacea or with dark skin that is prone to hyperpigmentation. Essentially, when dealing with skin that gets red and irritated easily, burns quickly in the sun, or is susceptible to dark spots, you must...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    There are definitely amazing biofeedback mechanisms going on in your skin all the time. Those tireless inflammatory cells go into action to repair the stratum corneum when it is wounded by a sunburn, a scrape, or excessive dryness caused by too much washing, which strips the skin of natural oils. But...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    THURSDAY, April 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A highly personalized vaccine can spur an immune response in people with advanced melanoma, a preliminary study finds.

    The experimental vaccine was tested in just three patients, and experts stressed that the findings show only that it can coax ...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    The fact is that sun does cause injury to your skin and can effect a positive anti-inflammatory response too. Like most things in the medicinal world, a little bit of sun can be good, but too much is very bad. Initially ultraviolet wavelengths penetrate the epidermis and interact with the Langerhans cells (those...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pathology:

    THURSDAY, April 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists who've created the first 3-D map of a person's skin say people are covered with the chemical residues from shampoos, beauty products and even clothing.

    "Our daily routines -- what we eat, what we put on our skin -- also become a part ...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    If you sleep too little, you're not giving the body time to repair itself. The nervous system has two states that are in balance. The sympathetic system, which is more in control while we're awake, keeps the blood flow near the core of the body. While we sleep, the parasympathetic nervous system runs...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    If you get a really bad flu or a fever, three to six months later you may notice a white horizontal band or indentation on some of your nails. It's called a Beau's line, and indicates that the nails stopped growing during a period of physical or emotional stress. Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- If you plan to exfoliate, get some professional advice first, a dermatologist suggests.

    "Before you exfoliate, you really need to understand your skin and skin type," Dr. Mary Lupo, a clinical professor of dermatology at Tulane University School...Full Article