Dr. Ellen Marmur, MD

Bio

Dr. Ellen Marmur is a leading dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon. She is a recognized and admired expert in skin cancer diagnosis and surgery, Mohs surgery reconstructive surgery, cosmetic surgery, and women'€™s health dermatology. In addition to her private practice, Dr. Marmur is an Associate Clinical Professor in both the Department of Dermatology and the Department of Genetics & Genomic Research at The Mount Sinai Medical Center.

Specialties:

Location:

  • New York, NY

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    WEDNESDAY, March 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Eczema isn't just a painful, chronic problem for many -- it's a big drain on the pocketbook, too, a new study finds.

    Researchers at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago report that adults with eczema have higher health...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Using common sense and adjusting your skin care products are the keys. With every season, reclassify your skin "type" and reevaluate your regimen based on that. Your skin will let you know what it needs: Is it feeling oily, dry, or irritated? Is it breaking out much more? In a warm, humid climate you may want to use an...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    In response to skin irritation (whether from an allergic reaction or product overkill) or when someone simply has no idea what kind of basics his or her skin may need, he needs to stop everything at once. Your skin needs to get back to its natural balance or imbalance with no intervention from topical...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Drug eruptions are often characteristic of certain medications. For example, targeted chemotherapy drugs (that zone in on one area of the body) -- such as Taxol, for breast cancer -- can cause fingernails and cuticles to become swollen and inflamed (a nail disease called paronychia). Taxol can also trigger...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Unfortunately, there is little one can do about a hereditary trait such as pigmented skin or the anatomical reality of thin skin under the eyes. Once they show up, dark circles can either be camouflaged with makeup or treated by a dermatologist. Dark circles can show up when you are exhausted too,...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Intense pulsed light (IPL) treatments are a great alternative for someone who doesn't need too much in the way of anti-aging (perhaps a patient in his or her late thirties with overall firm, healthy skin). IPL is incredibly successful at treating rosacea, freckles, and especially poikiloderma -- a m&eac...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Skin damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation continues long after you get out of the sun, even in the dark, a new study says.

    Researchers explain that UV light from the sun or tanning beds can damage DNA in melanocytes. Melanocytes are cells...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    From a doctor's perspective, the only real "skin type" classifications are Fitzpatrick Skin Types 1 to 6. Categorized by skin color, they gauge how a skin type responds to the sun. They may reflect ethnic variations in skin color as well. Type 1 is extremely fair and prone to sunburns, while Type 6 is very dark skin...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A cream used to treat the skin condition eczema in children does not appear to increase the risk of cancer, according to a study funded by the maker of the cream.

    Researchers looked at nearly 7,500 children in the United States who were given a...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    In the examining room, you will be asked to take all your clothes off and put on a gown that is open in the front. (There's no need to feel embarrassed; we doctors are used to doing this every day. But if you feel uncomfortable in any way, ask to have a nurse or doctor's assistant in the room during the exam....Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    When skin is extremely slack and sagging (on the upper eyelids or at the neck), even the most extreme nonsurgical treatments won't be able to repair it to the patient's satisfaction. This is when surgery is the best answer, and I encourage my patients to have it done. I've worked with people who...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Different types of light or energy sources convert energy to heat in (or on) the skin in order to effect some kind of change: decimating brown spots or red spider veins, firming the skin, resurfacing it, and even building up collagen and elastin. Like different types of peels and fillers, each modality...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Except for microdermabrasion, they all hurt. Why? If a cosmetic procedure is supposed to induce collagen production and build the extracellular matrix, the skin will have to incur some kind of injury to the dermis, and that will necessitate some pain. Although this seems contradictory, lasers, light...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say giving birth control information to women visiting dermatology clinics can help promote the safe use of the drug isotretinoin, an acne medication known to cause birth defects.

    Isotretinion was originally sold under the brand name...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    THURSDAY, Jan. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For certain people, the acne treatment Aczone may be linked to a rare blood disorder, a new case study contends.

    A 19-year-old woman who had used Aczone -- the skin gel version of the drug dapsone -- for a week developed a serious condition ca...Full Article