Dr. Anthony Komaroff, MD

Bio

Anthony L. Komaroff, MD, a Sharecare expert, is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Stanford University, Alpha Omega Alpha graduate of the University of Washington School of Medicine, and is board certified in Internal Medicine. He is the Simcox-Clifford-Higby Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and former Director of the Division of General Medicine in the Department of Medicine and a Senior Physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, MA. Dr. Komaroff is a practicing physician, who also teaches and conducts research at Harvard Medical School. He is the Founding Editor of Journal Watch, a publication that keeps doctors abreast of how the latest medical research affects medical practice. Since 1997, he has served as Editor in Chief of the Harvard Health Publications Division of Harvard Medical School which publishes health information for the general public. Dr. Komaroff's answers on this site are based on the judgments of many different faculty experts on the topics being discussed.

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital

Location:

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Vascular Medicine:

    MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many folks in their 30s and 40s chow down on burgers, fried chicken and other fatty foods without fear, figuring they have years before they need to worry about their cholesterol levels.

    But new research reveals that long-term exposure to even sli...Full Article

  • Anthony Komaroff, MD - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine
    Menopause symptoms affect almost all women, but the duration and severity varies.

    The "hot flash," a brief but uncomfortable sensation of warmth that spreads across the upper body and face, is the most common symptom. Sleep loss from hot flashes at night can cause mood swings and problems with...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiology:

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have uncovered a major genetic risk for heart failure -- a mutation affecting a key muscle protein that makes the heart less elastic.

    The mutation increases a person's risk of dilated cardiomyopathy. This is a form of heart failure ...Full Article

  • Anthony Komaroff, MD - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine
    Common "home remedies" for sciatica include:
    • Losing excess weight
    • Applying ice
    • Stretching and exercising, with the goal of strengthening the muscles of the abdomen and low back
    • Avoiding sitting too long, especially on a hard surface
    • Changing your mattress to one that is firmer and more
    ...Read More
  • Anthony Komaroff, MD - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine
    Catheter ablation is a bit like angioplasty because it is performed without major surgery, using instruments guided into the heart via tiny wires (catheters) that are inserted into a blood vessel in the groin. The similarity ends there, though. Angioplasty opens a closed or blocked coronary artery. C...Read More
  • Anthony Komaroff, MD - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine
    The following are medications used to treat high blood pressure:
    • Thiazide diuretics: chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Hygroton), hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix, HydroDiuril, Microzide), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zaroxolyn)
    • Beta blockers: atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (
    ...Read More
  • Anthony Komaroff, MD - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine
    Although total cholesterol levels are important, it's even more important to look at levels of different types of cholesterol, particularly low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). That is why the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) recommends that everyone age...Read More
  • Anthony Komaroff, MD - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine
    Diets, especially "crash" or "fad" diets, can lead to hair loss.

    If you have been on a diet that does not include enough protein, iron, and other dietary requirements, your hair loss may be from poor nutrition. If you are eating a balanced diet, it is less likely that you have a nutritional de...Read More
  • Anthony Komaroff, MD - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine
    Hair growth often declines as one grows older. About 50% of men and almost as many women older than 40 experience "androgenetic alopecia," or "pattern alopecia."

    This is an inherited type of hair loss. It is usually more noticeable in men, where hair begins thinning around the hairline near the temples...Read More
  • Anthony Komaroff, MD - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine
    In general, looking at the fingernails and toenails is not a reliable way to tell if you are healthy or not. But a careful examination of the nails can provide clues to certain diseases.

    Here are some examples:
    • Fungal infection: Toenail fungal infections affect up to 5% of the population.
    ...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neurology:

    MONDAY, Dec. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental therapy that kills off and then "resets" the immune system has given three years of remission to a small group of multiple sclerosis patients, researchers say.

    About eight in 10 patients given this treatment had no new adverse even...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neurology:

    WEDNESDAY, Dec. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who experienced childhood abuse or neglect have a higher risk of migraine headaches, suggests a study published online Dec. 24 in the journal Neurology.

    "Childhood maltreatment can have long-lasting effects, like associated medica...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Allergy / Immunology:

    MONDAY, Dec. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Certain immune system cells may play an important role in weight control, an early study suggests.

    Scientists had known that the immune cells may help ward off obesity in mice. The new findings are the first to suggest the same is true in humans, ...Full Article

  • Anthony Komaroff, MD - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine
    Based on studies in people, some researchers report that stressful situations can reduce various aspects of human immune response. A research team from Ohio State University that has long worked in this field suggests that psychological stress affects the immune system by disrupting communication between the...Read More
  • Anthony Komaroff, MD - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine
    Over the past few decades, advances in diagnosis and treatment have led to dramatic drops in the rate of deaths from heart disease. Still, this disease is often feared, and with good reason: it remains the leading cause of death for both men and women, killing about one in six people. In the United...Read More