A. Lee Dellon, MD, PhD

Bio

A. Lee Dellon graduated from Johns Hopkins University in 1966 and from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1970. He then completed eight years of additional training, including two years of surgery training at Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City, and two years of research at the National Cancer Institute, Surgery Branch, of the National Institutes of Health. He completed a Plastic Surgery Residency at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and a Hand Surgery Fellowship at the Raymond M. Curtis Hand Center, both in Baltimore. Dr. Dellon has received the Certificate of Added Qualifications in Hand Surgery and is Board Certified in Plastic Surgery. He is currently a Professor of Plastic Surgery and a Professor of Neurosurgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He received his PhD from University of Utrecht, Netherlands, for his work in preventing ulceration and amputation in patients with nerve compression and diabetic neuropathy.

Dr. Dellon’s research interests center on neural regeneration. In the basic research laboratory, his work included models for peripheral nerve compression, neuroma treatment, neural regeneration through absorbable conduits, and diabetic neuropathy. Dr. Dellon’s clinical work is focused on computer-linked devices to measure sensibility, treatment strategies for pain due to neuroma, use of bioabsorbable tubes as a substitute for nerve grafts, treatment of facial pain and of groin pain, and treatment of the symptoms of peripheral neuropathy related to nerve compression, whether due to diabetes, chemotherapy, or unknown causes.

He has won 23 national research awards, including the Radium Society Award in 1974, the Cleft Palate Award in 1977, and the Emanuel Kaplan Hand Surgery Award in 1985. Among the 18 Educational Foundation Awards from the American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, are included those for the immunobiology of basal and squamous cell carcinoma, prediction of recurrence in non-melanoma skin cancer, partial-thickness skin excision for treatment of benign dyskeratosis (psoriasis), surgical treatment of symptoms of diabetic neuropathy due to nerve compression, nerve decompression in leprosy, and partial joint denervation, and most-recently, in 2008, the mechanisms of increased pressure around peripheral nerves in the foot.

Dr. Dellon is the author of seven books, 82 book chapters, and more than 425 articles published in peer-reviewed journals. He is currently on the Editorial Boards of Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery, and The Journal of Hand Surgery. He has been on the Editorial Boards of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Annals of Plastic Surgery, Microsurgery, Peripheral Nerve Regeneration and Repair, Journal of Clinical and Experimental Plastic Surgery, Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery, Journal of Hand Therapy, Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association, and the Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripehral Nerve Injury and Repair.

Dr. Dellon is a founding member and past president of the American Society for Peripheral Nerve. He has been Vice President of the American Society of Reconstructive Microsurgery. He is the Director of the Dellon Institutes for Peripheral Nerve Surgery, with Institutes in Baltimore and Henderson, Nevada.

His most recent book is PAIN SOLUTIONS, a book of hope for people in pain, available on his website, www.dellon.com.

Specialties:

  • pain medicine

Affiliation:

  • Professor at Johns Hopkins University

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pain Medicine:

    THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new formulation of a powerful narcotic painkiller that discourages potential abusers from snorting or injecting the drug has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    Called Targiniq ER and made by Purdue Pharma, the pill is a co...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pain Medicine:

    WEDNESDAY, July 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Even though its use is often advised by doctors, the painkiller acetaminophen -- best known as Tylenol -- does not help treat lower back pain, according to a new Australian study.

    The researchers found the drug was no more effective than a dum...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pain Medicine:

    TUESDAY, July 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Relief for chronic pain may be just a phone call away, according to a new study.

    Pain is a major health problem in the United States and costs the country more than $600 billion each year in lost productivity and health care.

    For this stu...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pain Medicine:

    TUESDAY, July 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors in some states seem to wield a freer hand issuing prescriptions for powerful narcotic medications, leading to wide variations in narcotic drug use among states, U.S. health officials reported Tuesday.

    Physicians in Alabama -- the state wit...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Physical Medicine/rehabilitation:

    THURSDAY, June 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Walking the equivalent of an hour a day may help improve knee arthritis and prevent disability, new research suggests.

    Because of knee arthritis, many older adults find walking, climbing stairs or even getting up from a chair difficult. But thes...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pain Medicine:

    FRIDAY, May 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday gave its approval to the first generic version of the powerful pain reliever Celebrex (celecoxib).

    Celecoxib is a member of the cox-2 inhibitor family of painkillers, prescription medicines often used...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Physical Therapy:

    WEDNESDAY, May 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Physical therapy for people with arthritis of the hip doesn't help relieve pain or improve function more than receiving a sham treatment, a new study by Australian researchers suggests.

    "Receiving physical therapy did not add any greater benefit...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Rheumatology:

    WEDNESDAY, May 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Having a beer a few times a week might help women avoid painful rheumatoid arthritis, a new study suggests.

    The disease, which affects women more than men, is a form of arthritis linked to immune system dysfunction. According to the Arthritis F...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Rheumatology:

    THURSDAY, May 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Americans with arthritis are at higher risk for falls and fall-related injuries than those without the condition, a new study reveals.

    Rates of falls and fall-related injuries over the study's 12-month period were higher among middle-aged and olde...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Rheumatology:

    MONDAY, April 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Milk may be a useful weapon against arthritis of the knee for women, but the same can't be said for yogurt or cheese, a new study says.

    The more low-fat or fat-free milk women drank, the slower the progression of osteoar...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Physical Medicine/rehabilitation:

    FRIDAY, April 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Just one exercise education session works as well as expensive, long-term physical therapy in reducing pain in whiplash patients, a new study shows.

    The results, published in the April 4 issue of The Lancet, add to previous findings that lo...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Addiction Medicine:

    TUESDAY, April 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Adults whose parents were addicted to alcohol or drugs are at increased risk for arthritis, a new Canadian study contends.

    Researchers looked at more than 13,000 adults and found about 20 percent had been diagnosed with arthritis. More than 14 pe...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pharmacy:

    FRIDAY, March 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A drug often used to treat gout may reduce the risk of premature death in patients with this common form of arthritis, according to a new study.

    Previous research has associated gout with an increased risk of early death. This study examined how ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Rheumatology:

    WEDNESDAY, March 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- CT scans can help detect gout that's been missed by the current standard testing method, a new study suggests.

    Gout is a common and painful form of arthritis caused by a buildup of uric acid in the body. The standard test -- called needle aspi...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neurology:

    MONDAY, March 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Medical marijuana pills and sprays might ease the symptoms of multiple sclerosis, but most other alternative therapies do little to lessen the pain and muscle rigidity that often accompanies the disease, according to new guidelines.

    To reach that...Full Article