A. Lee Dellon, MD, PhD

Bio

A. Lee Dellon graduated from Johns Hopkins University in 1966 and from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1970. He then completed eight years of additional training, including two years of surgery training at Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City, and two years of research at the National Cancer Institute, Surgery Branch, of the National Institutes of Health. He completed a Plastic Surgery Residency at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and a Hand Surgery Fellowship at the Raymond M. Curtis Hand Center, both in Baltimore. Dr. Dellon has received the Certificate of Added Qualifications in Hand Surgery and is Board Certified in Plastic Surgery. He is currently a Professor of Plastic Surgery and a Professor of Neurosurgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He received his PhD from University of Utrecht, Netherlands, for his work in preventing ulceration and amputation in patients with nerve compression and diabetic neuropathy.

Dr. Dellon’s research interests center on neural regeneration. In the basic research laboratory, his work included models for peripheral nerve compression, neuroma treatment, neural regeneration through absorbable conduits, and diabetic neuropathy. Dr. Dellon’s clinical work is focused on computer-linked devices to measure sensibility, treatment strategies for pain due to neuroma, use of bioabsorbable tubes as a substitute for nerve grafts, treatment of facial pain and of groin pain, and treatment of the symptoms of peripheral neuropathy related to nerve compression, whether due to diabetes, chemotherapy, or unknown causes.

He has won 23 national research awards, including the Radium Society Award in 1974, the Cleft Palate Award in 1977, and the Emanuel Kaplan Hand Surgery Award in 1985. Among the 18 Educational Foundation Awards from the American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, are included those for the immunobiology of basal and squamous cell carcinoma, prediction of recurrence in non-melanoma skin cancer, partial-thickness skin excision for treatment of benign dyskeratosis (psoriasis), surgical treatment of symptoms of diabetic neuropathy due to nerve compression, nerve decompression in leprosy, and partial joint denervation, and most-recently, in 2008, the mechanisms of increased pressure around peripheral nerves in the foot.

Dr. Dellon is the author of seven books, 82 book chapters, and more than 425 articles published in peer-reviewed journals. He is currently on the Editorial Boards of Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery, and The Journal of Hand Surgery. He has been on the Editorial Boards of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Annals of Plastic Surgery, Microsurgery, Peripheral Nerve Regeneration and Repair, Journal of Clinical and Experimental Plastic Surgery, Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery, Journal of Hand Therapy, Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association, and the Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripehral Nerve Injury and Repair.

Dr. Dellon is a founding member and past president of the American Society for Peripheral Nerve. He has been Vice President of the American Society of Reconstructive Microsurgery. He is the Director of the Dellon Institutes for Peripheral Nerve Surgery, with Institutes in Baltimore and Henderson, Nevada.

His most recent book is PAIN SOLUTIONS, a book of hope for people in pain, available on his website, www.dellon.com.

Specialties:

  • pain medicine

Affiliation:

  • Professor at Johns Hopkins University

Activity

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