Barbara Ficarra, RN

Bio

Sharecare editorial advisory board member, and health educator, Barbara Ficarra, RN, BSN, MPA, is an award-winning broadcast journalist and a featured writer for The Huffington Post. She is the founder of Healthin30.com, which offers health news and advice from a nurse’s perspective. Barbara is an international speaker and she is on the front lines of health care as a registered nurse and a leading voice in health offering practical advice focusing on patient engagement and empowerment, health care social media, health IT, digital technology, (mHealth-mobile health, gamification, telemedicine), doctor|nurse team and healthy living. Barbara began her broadcasting career in radio as creator, host and executive producer of the award-winning Health in 30® radio show, which brought listeners the latest health information and featured renowned health and wellness guest experts. Barbara is a contributor to many health sites, is frequently quoted and featured by numerous media outlets, and has appeared on FOX News Live. You can watch her on Sharecare in dozens of Health Smarts videos, in which she delivers her trademark brand of advice: simple, practical and trustworthy tips to help people take charge of their health and feel their best. Barbara received a Broadcast Journalism Award of Excellence for Health in 30® from the American College of Emergency Physicians. The winning program, “Ins and Outs of the ER,” explained what patients should expect in the ER and explored the challenges created by crowding. In 2011, Healthin30.com was voted Best Health Blog by Healthline. Barbara was a board member for the National Association of Medical Communicators and served on the Academy of Judges for the International Health and Medical Media Awards. She was invited by Microsoft to judge a series of innovative technology entries for the Imagine Cup 2012. She served as faculty for the American Medical Association’s Medical Communications Conferences, has taught classes in media broadcasting, and is a team member for one of TEDMED’s 20 Great Challenges, Improving Medical Communication. Currently she is president of Barbara Ficarra Productions, LLC, and is a consultant, moderator on panels and webinars, and media trainer. She speaks internationally on healthcare issues, focusing on professional development, patient engagement and empowerment, social media, and digital technology, including mHealth (mobile health), gamification, health apps, telemedicine and telehealth, leveraging her experience as former senior director of clinical affairs for a telehealth company. She is also an administrative supervisor at a large university medical center, where she covers multiple medical and surgical units, critical care, oncology, cardiology, the psychiatric unit, women’s and children’s services and the emergency trauma department. She always encourages patients and their families to be proactive and take charge of their health. Her professional affiliations include the Association of Health Care Journalists, New York Women in Communications, Microsoft Health Users Group, HIMSS (Healthcare Information Management Systems Society) and American Telemedicine Association.

Activity

  • Barbara Ficarra, RN - ,  - Nursing
    Before you visit with your doctor, write down any questions you may have. By being prepared and organized, you will be able to communicate effectively with your doctor. Some general questions you may want to ask your doctor are:
    • What are the causes of my symptoms?
    • Will the symptoms go away? 
    ...Read More
  • Barbara Ficarra, RN - ,  - Nursing
    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, transgender is “a person whose gender identity and/or expression is different from that typically associated with their assigned sex at birth.”
     
    As a registered nurse, a health care professional, we educate, support and advocate for the rights,...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychiatry:

    TUESDAY, April 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital patients who are alcoholics have an increased risk of dying in the hospital, a new study finds.

    Researchers looked at about 12 years of data from more than 23,000 hospital patients with alcoholism and a "control group" of more than 233,0...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Healthcare Insurance & Policy:

    TUESDAY, April 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors may charge uninsured patients anywhere from two to 43 times what private insurance plans or Medicare pay for chemotherapy drugs, a new study estimates.

    Researchers said the findings, reported in the April issue of Health Affairs, h...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neurology:

    MONDAY, April 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cooling the body might help prevent or lessen brain damage caused by cardiac arrest, a new study suggests.

    People who received what is called targeted body temperature management after cardiac arrest -- when the heart stops beating -- had good out...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Internal Medicine:

    MONDAY, April 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Surgery to reopen blocked arteries in the legs of frail nursing home residents rarely gets them back on their feet, a new study shows.

    In fact, many elderly people who undergo the expensive procedure either lose more physical function or die withi...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Infectious Disease:

    MONDAY, April 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette smoke appears to strengthen a dreaded "superbug," new research in mice shows.

    Exposure to tobacco smoke prompts methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria to become even more aggressive, and makes it harder for th...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Emergency Medicine:

    MONDAY, April 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that the emergency room might be a good place to try to end the vicious cycle of gun violence among young adults.

    "This study shows that youth seen and treated in urban emergency departments for an assault also have an elevat...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Advanced Practice Nursing:

    THURSDAY, April 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The belief that a full moon is linked to increases in hospital admissions and births is just an old wives' tale, an astronomist says.

    "The moon is innocent," Jean-Luc Margot, a professor of planetary astronomy at the University of California, Lo...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Emergency Medicine:

    TUESDAY, March 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer people are being treated in U.S. emergency rooms for strokes caused by blood clots in the brain, which experts read as a sign that current stroke prevention methods are working.

    The rate of emergency department visits for either a stroke o...Full Article

  • Barbara Ficarra, RN - ,  - Nursing
    http://bit.ly/1EGbcTv

    “In 2013, 9 million people fell ill with #Tuberculosis #TB and 1.5 million died. It's preventable and treatable. #WorldTBDay #HealthEducation”

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  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Advanced Practice Nursing:

    TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Male nurses in the United States make more than females, and the pay gap has not narrowed in 25 years, a new study finds.

    The average difference is more than $5,000 a year across most settings and positions, the researchers found.

    "The r...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to choosing a surgeon and hospital for breast cancer treatment, white patients are more likely to make their selection based on reputation than black and Hispanic patients are, a new study shows.

    The findings suggest that minority...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Healthcare:

    WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new survey finds that hospital doctors don't treat patients differently because of race or income level, even though it detected unconscious bias in some clinicians.

    Researchers asked more than 200 doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltim...Full Article

  • Barbara Ficarra, RN - ,  - Nursing
    http://bit.ly/1b5k5yW

    “#GoodAdviceIn4Words Simple Steps = Big Impact! #HealthyLiving”

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