Wellness

Wellness

Wellness

Wellness is a difficult word to define. Traditionally wellness has meant the opposite of illness and the absence of disease and disability. More recently wellness has come to describe something that you have personal control over. Wellness is now a word used to describe living the best possible life you can regardless of whether you have a disease or disability. Your wellness is not only related to your physical health, but is a combination of things including spiritual wellness, social wellness, mental wellness and emotional wellness. Wellness is seen as a combination of mind, body and spirit. Different people may have different ideas about wellness. There is no single set standard for wellness and wellness is a difficult thing to quantify.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    AManuel Torres, MD, Family Medicine, answered on behalf of Baptist Health South Florida

    The heat doesn’t necessarily cause swelling. Swelling can be a result of sodium intake. For example, swelling of the extremities can also be due to cardiovascular disease, kidney disease or liver disease. So, if you have one of these diseases, it's important to follow up with your doctor to make sure the medicines you're taking are correct and that your diet is appropriate.

    For example, if a patient with cardiovascular disease has swollen limbs, they need to be mindful that entering a time of year in which we may exercise less or perhaps consume more. Therefore, it may be necessary to adjust his or her medications or diet. This is typically seen during the Christmas holiday season. Watching salt intake is very important, and salt intake increases significantly during that time of year. A lot of the foods that we enjoy during the holidays are very salty, so, balancing the person’s medication, hydration and salt intake can have an important effect. Swollen limbs can also be a result of other diseases. So the heat is not a factor.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    AManuel Torres, MD, Family Medicine, answered on behalf of Baptist Health South Florida

    That depends on the types of conditions. But, for the most part, people with a fairly common disease, like diabetes, have to be careful, not so much with the heat but with hydration. If diabetes fluctuates a lot, or is uncontrolled, the hemodynamic effect of uncontrolled hydration can affect the patient. One has to be very careful, always maintaining a good balance to keep out of danger. They can improve their health balancing calories with hydration as well as medication.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    AManuel Torres, MD, Family Medicine, answered on behalf of Baptist Health South Florida

    We need to take precautions during the summer because we do things outdoors. I'm always trying to encourage my patients to be more active with family activities and exercise out of doors, but they need to be more careful. We have to watch out for lightening when it rains and we also have to hydrate well in hot weather. Among the best methods of hydration – there’s no better substitute than water obviously - occasionally drinks like Gatorade and other types of hydration to replace electrolytes help. With these, you have to be very careful because they might have a lot of calories. It’s important, whenever I take my boys to the park, to always carry plenty of water, soft drinks or other fluids.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    The fatigue you feel in the winter months isn’t in your head. Energy levels are naturally depleted during winter thanks to factors like lack of sunlight (which triggers vitamin D deficiency), light changes that affect sleep patterns, and winter diet and medicines. Even the clutter that naturally accumulates during the cold months can leave you feeling overwhelmed and fatigued.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    What can I expect from a detox cleanse?

    A special bath can relax and detox you, rejuvenating your system and boosting energy. In this video, Mark Hyman, MD, describes an ultra-relaxing bath to Dr. Oz.


  • 1 Answer
    A
    AHealthwise answered
    1. Press the entire plastic strip firmly against a dry forehead.
    2. Hold the thermometer in place for the required amount of time. Time yourself with a watch or clock.
    3. Read the temperature before removing the thermometer.
    4. Clean the thermometer with cool soapy water and rinse it off before putting it away.
    5. Forehead thermometers are not as accurate as electronic and ear thermometers. If your baby is younger than age 3 months or your child's fever rises higher than 102°F (39°C), recheck the temperature using a better method.

    © Healthwise, Incorporated.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    What are some good home design tips?

    A well-designed home is not just pleasing to see -- it's better for your health. In this video, designer and Dr. Oz Show guest Nate Berkus gives some of his best decorating tips.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    AJohn C. Norcross, PhD, Psychology, answered
    Most of us have a long bucket list of behavioral goals and lifetime resolutions to pursue. How can we decide which goals to pursue first and which to add later?

    We can follow several research-driven guidelines:

    First, it helps to select two goals that complement and enrich each other. Exercise and weight loss, smoking and stress management, relationships and communication are natural pairings. Select two goals that complement each other.
     
    Second, honor your readiness to change and pursue those goals in which you’re farther along. You’re far more likely to succeed with behaviors already in the action stage than in the contemplation stage. And we know that your confidence and dedication will zoom once you discover your change-ability.

    Third, prioritize any behavior problems that immediately threaten your health or your future ability to change. You won’t be getting to many more goals if you do not first confront urgent health-compromising behaviors, such as obesity or depression.

    And fourth, chase your energy right now: What do you want to pursue at this time? Of course, all of your goals are important -- that’s why they are your goals. But you’re likely to feel more poised and psyched in the moment with some more than others. Honor that feeling in prioritizing goals.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    ARealAge answered

    All information that carries the RealAge name has been developed by our team of experts, which includes physicians, epidemiologists and medical writers who research the latest findings published in peer-reviewed medical and science journals. All RealAge content is held to stringent scientific review. Our scientific advisory board of renowned doctors includes:

    • Michael F. Roizen, MD
    • Mehmet C. Oz, MD
    • Roach, MD
    • Mike Clark, DPT
    • Steve Edelman, MD
    • James H. Fowler, PhD
    • John La Puma, MD, FACP
    • Keith Steward, MD, MBA
    • Jennifer Trachtenberg, MD, FAAP

    Take the RealAge Test!

    • 1 Answer
      A
      ARealAge answered

      The scientifically based scoring behind the RealAge test -- which assesses your body's physical age, not your calendar age -- was developed in the 1990s by a team of medical and scientific experts, including Dr. Michael Roizen, MD, and Dr. Keith Roach, MD. The team reviewed thousands of published, peer-reviewed studies to identify the key factors known to affect a person's physical age. Not surprisingly, these factors included smoking, blood pressure and blood cholesterol, along with many others.

      Since its creation, the RealAge Test has been updated to incorporate new findings and advances in science, math and technology. In 2009, results from several large, long-running studies spurred a complete update of the test. Many of the original RealAge factors remain, but some have been removed, and new ones -- such as whether or not you have health insurance and the quality of your sex life -- have been added. Our medical and scientific team continues to review the research on what makes people grow old too fast and what makes them stay younger, and updates the test as needed to keep it accurate and current.

      Among other criteria, the studies supporting the factors must reflect major research and be published in top-tier, peer-reviewed scientific or medical journals. All research is also assessed for quality, so that findings from large, well-designed randomized-controlled trials are given greater weight than studies showing only an epidemiological association. 

      Take the RealAge Test!