Vertigo & Dizziness Causes & Risk Factors

Vertigo & Dizziness Causes & Risk Factors

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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    Dr Oz Am I Normal 4 - Dizziness after having kids
    Watch this video to learn more from Dr. Mehmet Oz about dizziness.


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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    Vertigo
    Vertigo causes you to feel dizzy and can run in families.



     
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    Blood circulation disorders are the most common cause of dizziness. For example, if you feel dizzy from getting up out of bed too fast, it’s probably because the blood hasn't had a chance to catch up with your brain.  Or, when any part of the balance circuit is not be getting enough blood, you will feel dizzy or faint. Some people are light headed because of poor circulation or as a result of hypertension, diabetes, hardening of the arteries. Anemia is still another cause of lack of blood flow to the brain resulting in dizziness. In addition, stimulants (caffeine, nicotine, drugs) can also decrease blood flow to the brain.

    A blow to the head or injury can cause dizziness. Even a severe whiplash can cause some swelling in the circuits and make balancing a problem. Anytime the inner ear is injured, it can result in vertigo with subsequent loss of hearing and nausea.
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    Allergies with nasal congestion can result in dizziness and sometimes hearing loss. If you suffer with allergies, whenever you are exposed to an allergen (pollen, dust mites, mold, food, animal dander, or chemicals), the chances are good that you may have dizziness.  As the mucus produced from the allergic reaction subsides, usually the dizziness will go away.

    Allergies cause a constant runny nose, ongoing sneezing, swollen nasal passages, excess mucus, weepy eyes, and a scratchy palate and throat. A cough may result from postnasal drip. Some people with allergies feel only a drippy nose; others are so congested that the allergy affects every part of their lives.

    Infected ears and fluid in the eyes because of blocked Eustachian tubes are two common results of allergies in both adults and children.

    Viral or bacterial infections may also result in dizziness or vertigo.  Mastoiditis, a serious infection that extends far into your inner ear, can destroy your hearing and equilibrium, resulting in feelings of dizziness.
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    You risk of central vertigo increases if you have multiple sclerosis, blood vessel disease, or conditions that affect the brain or brain stem. Migraines and some drugs such as aspirin and anticonvulsants can increase your risk of vertigo and dizziness. Other factors that affect your senses such as alcohol can further increase your risk of vertigo and/or dizziness.

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    Your risk of developing peripheral vertigo and dizziness increase if you have a disorder or disease, like Meniere's disease or benign paroxysmal positional vertigo that disrupt the parts of the inner ear responsible for your balance and sending signals to the brain about your motion. Migraines and some drugs such as aspirin and anticonvulsants can increase your risk of vertigo and dizziness. Other factors that affect your senses such as alcohol can further increase your risk of vertigo and/or dizziness.

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    Vertigo and dizziness can have different causes. Peripheral vertigo is caused by an inner ear disorder that affects the parts of the ear (vestibular labyrinth, semicircular canal, and vestibular nerve) responsible for helping you balance. Common causes include ear infection, inflammation in the ear, Meniere's disease, and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Common causes of dizziness can include inner ear or brain disorders, low blood pressure, ear infection, heart problems, dehydration, and sitting or standing too quickly.

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    Your risk of developing objective vertigo and dizziness increase if you have a disorder or disease that affects your inner ears or brain. Migraines and some drugs such as aspirin and anticonvulsants can increase your risk of vertigo and dizziness. Other factors that affect your senses such as alcohol can further increase your risk of vertigo and/or dizziness.

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    Vertigo is caused can be caused by inner ear disorders, dehydration, low blood pressure, disorder that affect the brain, and disease. Dizziness is often caused by sitting or standing too quickly. Dizziness can also be caused by low blood pressure, ear infection, heart problems, and dehydration.

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    A sudden drop in blood pressure can limit the blood supply to your brain causing dizziness. Dizziness can also occur if your body goes into shock. In rare cases, stroke and blood vessel disease that affect the blood supply to the brain can also cause vertigo and dizziness.