Vertigo & Dizziness

Vertigo & Dizziness

Vertigo is a feeling that you are spinning or that the room is spinning around you. The most common form of vertigo is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Some of the symptoms of BPPV are dizziness, nausea, loss of balance, blurred vision and vomiting. This kind is rarely serious and can be treated. Vertigo can also be a sign of inflammation in the inner ear, which is called labyrinthitis (lab-rynth-I-tis). You might also have Mnire's disease, which consists of episode of vertigo and ringing in the ears. Vertigo can also be a sign of something more serious, so see your doctor to rule out anything serious.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
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    AUCLA Health answered
    The type of dizziness called instability may have multiple causes and is often due to neurological disease. Poor vision, peripheral neuropathy and cerebrovascular disease are common findings with this condition. Alcohol and a variety of medications, including pain relievers, tranquilizers, antidepressants and other drugs, may play a contributing role. Normal aging changes in posture and nerve function, combined with disease or medication, can also cause instability.
  • 1 Answer
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    AUCLA Health answered

    The most common syndrome of dizziness is what doctors refer to as “instability” -- a sensation of unsteadiness that occurs only when people are upright. They feel as though they are losing their balance or might stumble and often need to hold onto furniture or touch the walls when moving. They cannot walk in a straight line.

  • 1 Answer
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    AMichael Roizen, MD, Internal Medicine, answered
    When people get vertigo attacks, they feel as if the world is spinning. Nausea and anxiety follow. Although these dizzy spells may last only 30 seconds to 2 minutes, they're discombobulating.

    People who get hit with benign positional vertigo can't be sure of what's up or what's down. For the more than 160,000 North Americans diagnosed with vertigo every year, that makes it hard to drive (you never know when an attack might hit) or feel comfortable with physical activity (just tilting your head can trigger a dizzy spell).
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    If you have vertigo that comes and goes, you need to go to a clinic or doctor. Vertigo is usually harmless, but the cause needs to be identified. Your doctor can often give you medicine or a simple treatment in the office to lessen or relieve your symptoms. Sometimes, the doctor may recommend certain exercises or therapy. This depends on what may be causing your vertigo.
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    Call 911 or go to the hospital emergency room if you have vertigo along with one or more of these symptoms:
    • Severe headache
    • Temperature over 100 degrees F
    • Double vision
    • Trouble speaking or hearing
    • Inability to walk
    • Passing out
    • Numbness or tingling
    • Chest pain or severe trouble breathing
    • Vomiting that won't stop
  • 1 Answer
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    Healthcare professionals recommend that if an individual is susceptible to vertigo (dizziness), they should: be aware of the possibility of losing balance, which can lead to falling and serious injury. Patients are directed to sit or lie down immediately when feeling dizzy; avoid driving a car or operating heavy machinery if experiencing frequent dizziness; use good lighting when getting out of bed at night; walk with a cane for stability; and avoid using caffeine, alcohol, and tobacco. Excessive use of these substances can constrict blood vessels and worsen signs and symptoms. Always work closely with a doctor to manage symptoms effectively. A doctor or pharmacist can also advise the individual about certain medications that may cause dizziness.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/

    Copyright © 2012 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.

  • 1 Answer
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    AHealthwise answered
    Lightheadedness makes a person feel that he or she is about to faint or pass out. It is caused by a momentary drop in blood pressure and blood flow to the head.Nausea or vomiting sometimes accompanies lightheadedness. Symptoms usually improve or go away after lying down.It is common to feel lightheaded occasionally. Lightheadedness often occurs when a person gets up too quickly from a seated or lying position (orthostatic hypotension).Unlike vertigo, lightheadedness does not produce a sensation of movement. Vertigo causes a spinning or whirling sensation that may lead to nausea or vomiting, loss of balance, trouble walking or standing, and falling.

    This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. To learn more visit Healthwise.org

    © Healthwise, Incorporated.

  • 2 Answers
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    Dizziness is a symptom, not a disease. Dizziness is defined as a feeling of being woozy, drunk, unsteady, or giddy. It is a general term used to describe the sensation of imbalance.

    Individuals often describe balance problems in terms of vertigo, dizziness, lightheadedness, and motion sickness.

    The term vertigo refers to a specific type of dizziness that causes the sensation of spinning or whirling. This generally occurs as a result of a disturbance in balance (equilibrium). Vertigo also may be used to describe feelings of dizziness, lightheadedness, faintness, and unsteadiness. For the purposes of this monograph, vertigo and dizziness will be used interchangeably.

    Vertigo is one of the most common health problems in adults. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), about 40% of people in the United States experience feeling dizzy at least once during their lifetime. Prevalence is slightly higher in women and increases with age.

    While the majority of individuals with dizziness experience mild to moderate symptoms, severe symptoms of dizziness involving disability are seen in an estimated 10% of the patients.

    Vertigo may be related to disorders of the vestibular system (the system of balance), injury, or medications. As individuals age, they also become more prone to vestibular disorders, such as vertigo.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/

    Copyright © 2012 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.

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  • 5 Answers
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    AHealthwise answered

    Vertigo (dizziness) is an uncomfortable feeling of motion when there is no actual movement. The feeling of motion is commonly described as spinning or whirling. But it also may include sensations of falling or tilting.

    Vertigo can cause nausea and vomiting. You may find it difficult to walk, stand, or keep your balance.

    Causes for vertigo include problems with nerves, blood flow, and the inner-ear.

    Infrequent episodes of vertigo may not require treatment. If vertigo is severe or frequent, treatment will depend on the specific cause.



    This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. To learn more visit Healthwise.org

    © Healthwise, Incorporated.

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  • 1 Answer
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    Because central vertigo is linked to a disorder or disease in the brain, central vertigo can only be prevented by preventing these brain conditions. Dizziness triggered by dehydration, poor eating habits, fatigue, or stress can be prevented with lifestyle changes. Vertigo and dizziness cannot be prevented unless the underlying cause is diagnosed.