Urinary Tract Infections (UTI)

Urinary Tract Infections (UTI)

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  • 1 Answer
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    AHealthwise answered
    • A home test for a urinary tract infection (UTI) should be done under the direction of your doctor, so that abnormal test results caused by a problem other than a UTI will not be missed. Although a home test kit may detect the presence of a UTI, it can't provide information about the location of the infection. The infection may be in the kidneys, ureters, bladder, urethra, or, in men, in the prostate gland. More tests may be needed to determine the location and cause.
    • Positive test results do not always mean that you have an infection. If you have a positive test result, be sure to talk to your doctor. If you have symptoms of a urinary tract infection but your self-test is negative, contact your doctor for an evaluation.
    • Home test kits are not 100% accurate. If you continue to have symptoms of a urinary tract infection even though the test results show you do not have an infection (negative result), tell your doctor. Painful urination can be caused by other problems, such as a vaginal yeast infection or sexually transmitted infection. Frequent urinary tract infections can be a symptom of a serious problem, such as kidney stones, a tumor or infection of the prostate gland. Do not use a home test as a substitute for regular medical checkups.
    • Some doctors may order another UTI test through a laboratory before prescribing antibiotics to treat an infection found using a home test kit.
    • Do not use medicine left over from treating another infection to treat a new UTI. Also, if your doctor has given you antibiotics for a UTI, be sure to take all of the antibiotics in your prescription, even if your symptoms go away before the prescription is gone. A UTI can return or get worse if you do not take the full course of antibiotics.
    • Many types of home test kits can be ordered over the Internet. If you have access to the Internet, you can find this information by searching for the type of test or the name of the manufacturer.
    • Some home test kits may come with cranberry or blueberry capsules or other medicine for use after the test. Any medicines that are included in your kit are not a substitute for follow-up with your doctor.


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  • 1 Answer
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    AGrace Hyun, MD, Urology, answered on behalf of The Mount Sinai Health System
    Often urinary tract infection (UTI) is the first sign of a congenital bladder or kidney anomaly. These UTIs may go undiagnosed if there is not a proper examination of the urine. If a true UTI exists then renal and bladder ultrasound as well as a VCUG should be performed to rule out any renal or bladder anomalies. Thirty to forty percent of children with a UTI accompanied by a high fever will have some type of urologic anomaly from birth.
  • 1 Answer
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    AMichael Roizen, MD, Internal Medicine, answered
    Antibiotics are most beneficial during the first 6 months of treatment. That's when a urinary tract infection (UTI) is most likely to stage a comeback in infection-prone kids. Long-term antibiotic use in children with UTIs has been linked to antibiotic resistance (when wily germs mutate to the point that they laugh off an antibiotic).

    If your child has a normal urinary tract, she may be able to prevent future infections by following a few simple rules:
    • Go when she needs to go. Holding it till she's doing the pee-pee dance outside the bathroom can cause urine to back up and allow bacteria to thrive.
    • Clean properly. Children need to be taught to wipe front to back after urinating to avoid carrying bacteria from the rectum to the urinary tract.
    • Avoid bubble baths and strong soaps. Both can irritate the urethra and make it painful to urinate. If she tries not to go because of this, it increases her UTI risk.

  • 1 Answer
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    ARealAge answered

    Menopausal women are more prone to urinary tract infections (UTIs). The primary symptoms are painful urination or a need to urinate and void frequently. This problem is encountered more frequently after the age of 60 (i.e., after menopause) but may occur earlier. UTIs may be brought on by loss of estrogen and the resulting skin and glandular thinning around the urethra. Estrogen replenishment or local estrogen treatment may reduce the likelihood of urinary tract infections.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    Call or go to the doctor or clinic if you think you have a bladder infection (urinary tract infection). Only a doctor can give you medicine to cure a UTI. If you can't reach the doctor or clinic, go to an urgent-care clinic or to the hospital.

    To treat pain while you wait for medical care, use acetaminophen (like Tylenol) or ibuprofen (like Advil). Follow the instructions for timing and dose. Do not give aspirin to a child or teen -- it increases risk for a serious problem called Reye's syndrome.
  • 1 Answer
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    ALeo Galland, MD, Integrative Medicine, answered
    Like their cousins, cranberries, blueberries contain flavonoids that can prevent urinary tract infection. Blueberry flavonoids prevent bacteria that cause urinary infections from binding to the lining of the bladder and can even inhibit the growth of bacteria.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    AHealthwise answered

    If you have symptoms of a urinary tract infection (UTI), your initial evaluation by your doctor will include a medical history and physical exam. A medical history includes an evaluation of your current urinary tract symptoms, history of urinary tract infections or other urinary tract problems, family health history and sexual history. You and your doctor will discuss your general health and the results of previous testing.

    For women, your doctor will:

    • Evaluate the possibility of pregnancy and any history of reproductive problems.
    • Include a pelvic exam if symptoms indicate a possible pelvic infection or urethritis.
    • Examine your lower back, abdomen and the area just above where the pelvic bone and the lower abdomen meet for tenderness, pain or abnormalities.
    • Take your temperature.

    For men, your doctor will:

    • Evaluate any history of prostate problems.
    • Examine your genitals, lower back and abdomen.
    • Examine your rectum and rectal area to check for prostate enlargement, growths or inflammation.
    • Take your temperature.


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  • 1 Answer
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    AHealthwise answered

    Findings of the medical history and physical exam include the following:

    Normal
    • No pain, growths or abnormalities
    • No prostate enlargement or tenderness (men only)
    • No discharge from the urethra
    Abnormal
    • Pain or discomfort in response to pressure on the lower back, abdomen or the area above the pelvic bone
    • Growths or abnormalities detected during pelvic or rectal exam
    • Enlarged or tender prostate gland (men only)
    • Discharge from the urethra


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  • 1 Answer
    A
    AHealthwise answered

    Surgery is not used to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children.

    If there is a problem with the structure of the urinary tract that is causing frequent, severe infections and increasing the child's risk of long-term complications, the doctor may consider surgery to correct the problem. For instance, children with severe vesicoureteral reflux may benefit from surgery.



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  • 1 Answer
    A
    AHealthwise answered

    Oral antibiotic medicine usually is effective in treating urinary tract infections (UTIs). In many cases, if the symptoms and urinalysis suggest a UTI, the doctor will start medicine without waiting for the results of a urine culture.

    The doctor may give intravenous (IV) antibiotics if your baby is:

    • Younger than 3 months.
    • Too ill or nauseated to take oral medicine.
    • Very sick with a severe kidney infection.

    The doctor will stop the IV medicine and begin oral medicine treatment after your child is stabilized and feeling better.

    Preventive antibiotics - To prevent kidney damage that can result from recurrent infection, the doctor may prescribe long-term treatment with antibiotics for children who are at risk for repeat infections. The doctor may consider preventive antibiotics:

     

    • While waiting for the results of tests done after treatment for a child's first UTI.
    • If tests done after treatment for a child's first UTI show a structural problem in the urinary tract, such as vesicoureteral reflux, that increases the child's risk for recurrent UTIs.
    • For children who have frequent UTIs, with or without an abnormality of the urinary tract.

    Preventive treatment may last from several months to several years. Experts disagree about the best approach. Some doctors believe that long-term use of low-dose antibiotics can safely prevent UTIs in children, especially in children who have vesicoureteral reflux. Whether long-term antibiotics prevent kidney damage needs more study. Some doctors are more hesitant about prescribing antibiotics for long-term use because of increasing concern about the growth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Medication choices - Antibiotics are used to kill the bacteria that cause UTIs.

     

    What to think about - Give your child the antibiotics as directed. Do not stop using them just because your child feels better. Your child needs to take the full course of medicine. Your child may begin to feel better soon after starting the medicine. But if you stop giving your child the medicine too soon, the infection may return or get worse. Also, not taking the full course of medicine encourages the development of bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics. This makes antibiotics less effective and future bacterial infections harder to treat.

     



    This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. To learn more visit Healthwise.org

    © Healthwise, Incorporated.