Question

Type 1 Diabetes

What is type 1 diabetes?

A Answers (14)

  • AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    Diabetes and Insulin
    Type 1 diabetes is a disease in which there is very little or none of the hormone insulin, which is needed to help the body use fuel for energy. Watch the video to learn more about type 1 diabetes.


  • AStacy Wiegman, PharmD, Pharmacy, answered
    Type 1 diabetes is a form of diabetes in which the body produces little or no insulin. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in the blood instead of going into the cells to be used for energy.

    Unlike the more common type 2 diabetes, type 1 is most likely an autoimmune disorder, in which the body attacks its own cells -- specifically, the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. Type 1 diabetes is most often diagnosed in children, adolescents and young adults. It is a lifelong disease, and no cure has yet been discovered. But with proper care, the outcome for people with type 1 diabetes can be good.
  • Type 1 diabetes is a metabolic disorder in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin, a hormone required to produce energy. Although it may develop at any age, type 1 diabetes is also referred to as juvenile diabetes, as it usually develops during adolescence. Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition that must be managed daily with insulin treatments. However, with recent improvements in care, those with type 1 diabetes can live productive, healthy lives.

  • In people with type 1 diabetes, the body does not make enough insulin. This is because most of the cells of the pancreas that make insulin have been destroyed by the immune system. Eventually, all of the cells that make insulin are destroyed and no insulin is produced. That is why type 1 diabetes is also called an autoimmune disorder. People with type 1 diabetes must take injections of insulin in order to live.

    Type 1 diabetes is also called immune-mediated diabetes. It is a form of diabetes that tends to develop before age 30 but may occur at any age. It’s usually caused when the immune system attacks the beta cells of the pancreas and the pancreas can no longer produce insulin. People who have type 1 diabetes must take insulin to survive.

  • Type 1, also known as juvenile diabetes, occurs when the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Type 1 diabetes develops suddenly and most commonly affects people under the age of 30, the average age of onset being between 12 and 14.

    In type 1 diabetes, high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) lead to excretion of glucose in the urine and an accompanying increase in urine production. If inadequate amounts of insulin are administered to patients with type 1 diabetes, unrestrained release of fatty acids from adipose (fat) tissue leads to the overproduction of ketone bodies in the liver. Accumulation of ketone bodies can cause a life-threatening condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).

    People with diabetes may also suffer from low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) if too much insulin is given for treatment.

    After 10 to 20 years of diabetes, patients are likely to develop complications, such as vision disorders, kidney damage, and peripheral nerve degeneration (neuropathy). Strict control of blood glucose can delay or prevent these complications. Loss of sensation in the feet may allow injuries to go unchecked and become infected. In addition, people with diabetes are at increased risk for developing narrowing of the coronary arteries as well as narrowing of arteries supplying the brain and legs. The combination of foot infections and decreased blood supply can lead to gangrene (tissue death), which may require amputation. Diabetes mellitus (and its complications) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States.

    Treatment of type 1 diabetes requires between two and four daily injections of insulin. (Insulin cannot be taken orally, since digestive juices would destroy it.) In addition, diet and exercise must be carefully planned to ensure that blood glucose levels are neither too high nor too low. Treatment is largely a process of self-management. Although there is no cure, almost all people with diabetes are able to control their symptoms and lead full, productive lives.

  • AUCLA Health answered
    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder in which the body does not produce insulin and destroys the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas that help regulate blood glucose levels. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs in children and young adults between the ages of 6 and 15 years and cannot be prevented. Since the pancreas can no longer produce insulin, people with type 1 diabetes are required to take insulin daily, either by injection or via an insulin pump.
  • Type 1 diabetes usually occurs in children. It is also called juvenile onset diabetes mellitus or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In this type, your pancreas does not make enough insulin and you have to take insulin injections for the rest of your life.
  • AScripps Health answered

    Type 1 diabetes occurs most often in children and young adults. It is an autoimmune disease, which means the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys its own insulin-producing (beta) cells.

  • AEric Olsen, Fitness, answered
    Type 1 diabetes, or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), most often occurs in men and women under the age of 20. It results from the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, which investigators believe occurs when the body's own immune system attacks these cells, a malfunction that may be precipitated by a viral infection.
  • Type 1 diabetes was previously known as juvenile diabetes. It is also called insulin-dependent diabetes because people with this disorder must take insulin to stay alive. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by high blood glucose levels caused by a decreased amount or a total lack of insulin. It can occur at any age but is usually diagnosed in children and young adults. It occurs when the body's immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroys them. The pancreas then produces little or no insulin. As a result sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood, causing many problems, including retinopathy, poor circulation, heart disease and death.

     

  • AWilliam Lee Dubois, Endocrinology/diabetes/metabolism, answered
    Type 1 diabetes (T-1) is an autoimmune disorder. The body’s immune system attacks and kills off the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas (the small ugly-looking organ that hides behind your stomach and causes so much trouble for all us D-folk).

    T-1 used to be called “Juvenile Diabetes” because it often struck early in life. All people with T-1 must take insulin.

    Insulin is a hormone that allows sugar to be used by the body. Every cell in your body—from a brain cell, to a coronary artery cell, to a skin cell in your little toe—eats a type of sugar called glucose. That’s how the cells live.
  • Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder. In type 1 diabetes, the immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells -- called beta cells -- of the pancreas. Due to this attack, the beta cells gradually lose the ability to produce insulin. Without insulin, the body is unable to use glucose for energy.
  • AHealthwise answered

    Type 1 diabetes is a lifelong disease that happens when the pancreas stops making insulin. It usually develops in children and young adults.

    Insulin lets sugar (glucose) move from the blood into the body's cells, where it can be used for energy or stored. Without insulin, sugar can't get into the cells, and your blood sugar gets too high. Over time, high blood sugar can lead to problems with your eyes, heart, blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys.

    Treatment for type 1 diabetes focuses on keeping your blood sugar level in a safe range by eating a balanced diet, taking insulin injections, and getting regular exercise.



    This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. To learn more visit Healthwise.org

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  • ATonya Bolden, Alternative/complementary Medicine, answered

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease results when the body’s system for fighting infection (the immune system) turns against a part of the body. In diabetes, the immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroys them. The pancreas then produces little or no insulin. A person who has type 1 diabetes must take insulin daily to live.

    At present, scientists do not know exactly what causes the body’s immune system to attack the beta cells, but they believe that autoimmune, genetic, and environmental factors, possibly viruses, are involved. Type 1 diabetes accounts for about 5 to 10 percent of diagnosed diabetes in the United States. It develops most often in children and young adults but can appear at any age.
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