Tongue Spasm

Tongue Spasm

Spasming or twitching of the tongue is a symptom, not a condition, so you need to ask your doctor. The symptom can be mild or severe, and even a quick web search shows almost 500 different conditions in which a symptom may be a muscle convulsion in your tongue.

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    ARealAge answered
    Tongue spasms are a form of dystonia, a condition that can affect people of all ages. Aging can affect the way a person responds to medication. Over time dystonia may cause painful inflammation in the muscles that experience spasm, including those in the mouth.
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    Dystonia and Meige's syndrome are two disorders in which people may experience tongue spasm as a symptom. Both disorders result in involuntary contractions of the muscles, which may affect the muscles in the face or mouth. Treatment options can help to manage symptoms of the disorders.

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    Surgery is not usually a treatment for tongue spasm. This condition is usually treated with medication, and it sometimes goes away on its own. Talk to your doctor to find the best treatment option for you.

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    ARealAge answered
    Medications to treat tongue spasm include sedatives such as baclofen or clonazepam to reduce involuntary twitching or convulsions of the tongue. Botox can also be used to help paralyze muscles to prevent uncontrolled tongue convulsions.
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    ARealAge answered

    If your eyes blink during tongue spasm you may have a condition known as dystonia. Involuntary blinking of the eyes is one of the many symptoms of dystonia, a neurological movement disorder that causes uncontrolled and involuntary muscle contractions.

    Lingual dystonia is a specific type of the condition that affects the tongue and causes it to twitch or tremor. Other conditions may also cause eye blinking and tongue spasms, so it's important to see your doctor if you have these symptoms.

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    Your tongue spasm may not go away. Tongue spasm can have a variety of causes. All tongue spasm cases are different, but sometimes the symptoms of this condition can disappear. Talk to your doctor about a prognosis for your tongue spasm.

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    ARealAge answered
    If you are experiencing tongue spasms that won't go away, it's a good idea to see a doctor. You can prepare by making notes about your symptoms and writing down any questions you may have. Tongue spasms can be caused by many things, including stroke, cerebral palsy, and multiple sclerosis. A number of antipsychotic drugs can also cause tongue spasms. If necessary, your doctor can take an EEG or refer you to a neurologist. Other tests, such as MRI or CT scan, can reveal possible neurological problems.
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    Tongue spasm does not usually run in families. Tongue spasm is usually a result of stroke or of taking certain medications. Some diseases can cause tongue spasm, but there is no evidence that this condition is genetic.

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    ARealAge answered
    Tongue spasms -- involuntary tongue movement or twitching -- can be caused by various illnesses. Stroke, cerebral palsy, and multiple sclerosis, for instance, affect the part of the brain that controls muscle movement. The result may be tongue spasms. Disorders such as dystonia and Meige's syndrome produce involuntary contractions of face and mouth muscles and could cause tongue spasms.
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    ARealAge answered
    A tongue spasm is an example of a focal dystonia, which is an involuntary and sometimes painful movement of muscles in the body -- in this case, the muscles in the tongue. Tongue spasms can be serious if they make talking and swallowing difficult and uncomfortable.
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