Stage 3 Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Stage 3 Squamous Cell Carcinoma

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    Stage 3 squamous cell carcinoma affects men and women in pretty much the same ways. The only difference between its effects on men and women is that males are more likely than females to develop any stage of squamous cell carcinoma, including stage 3. However, because this is a relatively common type of cancer for both sexes, it's important that everyone take precautions to protect their skin from the sun and to check their skin frequently for any symptoms of squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Sun exposure is one of the most significant risk factors for stage 3 squamous cell carcinoma. Sun exposure, especially over many years, greatly increases the amount of ultraviolet (UV) radiation your skin gets. It's thought that those UV rays are what may damage DNA and initially cause stage 3 squamous cell carcinoma. Because of this risk, it's a good idea to avoid excessive sun exposure and to protect your skin with sunscreen and protective clothing.

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    Squamous cell carcinoma at any stage, including stage 3, very rarely affects children. The average age when people are first diagnosed with the condition is 66 years old. In general, younger people are starting to be affected by squamous cell carcinoma much more frequently. However, it's still very rare for children to develop this condition because it's often caused by a lifetime of exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

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    Stage 3 squamous cell carcinoma may impair your body's ability to fight other illnesses directly or indirectly. Your lymph nodes are an important part of the immune system, so if stage 3 squamous cell carcinoma has spread to the lymph nodes, it may affect your body's response to illness. Some risk factors for squamous cell carcinoma, including certain rare genetic disorders and anything that causes a compromised immune system, may harm your ability to fight illness. In addition, treatment for stage 3 squamous cell carcinoma, especially surgery and radiation, may also cause illnesses to have a more severe effect.

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    Unfortunately, there's no guaranteed cure for stage 3 squamous cell carcinoma. Treatments for the disease can be effective if they're started as soon as possible. Some of the most effective treatment options may include surgical removal of the tumor (including Mohs surgery) and other therapies like radiation or chemotherapy. Talk to your doctor to determine the most effective treatment options for you.

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    Stage 3 squamous cell carcinoma is more serious than earlier stages of the cancer because it's started to spread. At this fourth stage, squamous cell carcinoma has moved past the skin and into nearby bone and lymph nodes. If it's left untreated, the cancer will continue to spread throughout the body, making it difficult to treat. The earlier it's found and treated, the better the chances for recovery, so talk to your doctor as soon as you notice any symptoms of stage 3 squamous cell carcinoma.

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    It's difficult to determine the exact number of cases of stage 3 squamous cell carcinoma. This is due in part to the fact that the cancer may be diagnosed and treated before it reaches stage 3, or it may not be diagnosed till it's reached a later stage. The disease usually progresses pretty slowly, so stage 3 may not be as common as earlier stages. In general, squamous cell carcinoma is a pretty common type of skin cancer. It's estimated that there are about 200,000 to 300,000 new cases diagnosed in the United States each year.

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    Caring for someone with stage 3 squamous cell carcinoma involves supporting them both physically and emotionally. Diagnosis and treatment are especially difficult times during which your loved one will need your support. After treatment, ensure they see their doctor for regular follow-up appointments, especially within the first year after treatment. Encourage them to check their skin frequently and to protect their skin from the sun. Remember that being diagnosed with any stage of squamous cell carcinoma may cause emotional stress, so support them as much as possible as they cope with the disease's emotional challenges.

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    Managing your stage 3 squamous cell carcinoma on a daily basis begins with treatment. Once you've been treated, it's important to check in with your doctor regularly to make sure the cancer hasn't come back or spread, especially within the first year following treatment. It's also very important to continue checking your own skin frequently, particularly in the area where the tumor originally occurred. Protect your skin from the sun with sunscreen and long-sleeved clothing. Taking care of your overall health is important for managing stage 3 squamous cell carcinoma, so eat a balanced diet and don't smoke. Care for your emotional health, too, by taking advantage of resources like counseling, support groups, and friends and family.

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    There are several things you can do that may help prevent stage 3 squamous cell carcinoma. If you are diagnosed with an earlier stage of squamous cell carcinoma, the most important way to prevent it from advancing to stage 3 is to get treatment right away. It's also important to check your skin regularly for any unusual symptoms, especially if you've had an earlier stage of squamous cell carcinoma or if you've had any type of skin cancer. To prevent squamous cell carcinoma from developing in the first place, one important thing you can do is to limit your sun exposure. Avoid the sun when it's at its strongest (10 a.m to 4 p.m.). If you are outside, wear a strong sunscreen year-round, and wear protective clothing that covers your arms and legs. Take care of your overall health by eating a nutritious diet rich in antioxidants, and don't smoke or quit smoking.