Quit Smoking

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    ADouglas Severance, MD, Family Medicine, answered
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    ADouglas Severance, MD, Family Medicine, answered
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    ARobin Miller, MD, Integrative Medicine, answered
    Are people getting better about keeping their homes and cars smoke free?

    Many people have smoke-free rules for their homes and cars. The amount of exposure to secondhand smoke in the U.S. varies by state. In this video, Robin Miller, MD shares which states have the least and greatest exposure to secondhand smoke.

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    In the United States, 40% of men and 34% of women with mental illness are smokers. Additionally, 48% of all smokers with mental illness are at or below poverty level.

    (The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the U.S. government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.)
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    AUCLA Health answered

    Although effective new strategies have increased the success rates among people attempting to quit, those rates are still only about 20 percent. But a relapse shouldn’t be seen as a sign that trying to quit is futile. “If you’ve tried before, statistics show you actually have a better chance of being successful,” UCLA internist Mark S. McGowan, M.D., says.

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    • Tobacco may interact with blood pressure-lowering agents. Caution is advised in people taking herbs or supplements that affect blood pressure.

    • Tobacco may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by some herbs or supplements.

    • Tobacco may also interact with acupuncture therapy, agents that affect nicotine receptors, Alzheimer's disease agents, antianxiety agents, anticancer agents, antidepressants, antihistamines, antioxidants, antipsychotics, beta-carotene, blood vessel-widening agents, cocoa, curcumin, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, a chemical found in tea), flavonoid-rich foods (e.g., berries, citrus fruits, red wine), folic acid, fruits and vegetables, grape seed extract, green tea, lobelia, marijuana, meditation therapy, menthol, Mint Snuffâ„¢, mucus-clearing agents, mustard family vegetables (e.g., broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage), Nicobrevin®, oat extract, probiotic supplements (healthy bacteria), spirulina, St. John's wort, vitamin A, and vitamin E.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/

    Copyright © 2012 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.

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    • Tobacco may interact with blood pressure-lowering agents. Caution is advised in people taking any drugs that affect blood pressure.

    • Tobacco may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by some drugs. Examples include benzodiazepines such as lorazepam (Ativan®) or diazepam (Valium®), barbiturates such as phenobarbital, narcotics such as codeine, some antidepressants, and alcohol. Caution is advised while driving or operating machinery.

    • Tobacco may also interact with agents that affect nicotine receptors, agents that block cannabinoid receptors, alcohol, Alzheimer's disease agents, antianxiety agents, anticancer agents, antidepressants, antihistamines, antipsychotics, blood vessel-widening agents, marijuana, nicotine replacement therapies, opiates, and silver acetate.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/

    Copyright © 2012 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.

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    • Avoid tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke during pregnancy. Some research has suggested that tobacco exposure may increase the risk of complications during pregnancy and delivery, and harmfully affect both babies and young children. Increased risk of asthma, early delivery, low birthweight, learning and behavior deficits, random abortion, ruptured membranes, nonuterine pregnancy, and maternal and newborn death have been reported.

    • Avoid use while breastfeeding. Nicotine has been found in human breast milk. Smoking may lower breast milk production and quality. Smoking may result in the early weaning and slow growth of babies.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/

    Copyright © 2012 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.

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    Adults (18 years and older):

    • Tobacco has been taken by mouth as a tea or smoked as part of a cigarette. Nicotine-only products are available; however, they are not considered dietary supplements.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/

    Copyright © 2012 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.

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    • Nicotiana tabacumis the most commonly used tobacco plant for commercial tobacco products. The leaves of the tobacco plant are the source of all smoking and chewing tobacco products. Tobacco leaves contain around 2-8% nicotine.

    • Tobacco has been reportedly used for many conditions in traditional and folk medicine. Limited research suggests that tobacco may be used to treat Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, or nicotine cravings.

    • However, it is well-known that smoking tobacco represents a major public health concern. Nicotine is highly addictive and contains several compounds known to cause cancer. Nearly one-third of people who try a cigarette later become addicted to nicotine. An estimated 25-35% of all cancer-related deaths are due to nicotine.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/

    Copyright © 2012 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.